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Seminar explores funding

first_img Cotton said she first thought of creating such a course after attending a talk by Kathie Olsen, a member of Notre Dame’s research and government relations team, titled “How Not to Get an NSF Grant.” Junior Rachel Cotton and College of Science Dean Gregory Crawford led the trip to the nation’s capital. Cotton, a biological sciences major, said the students visited federal and member-funded organizations, as well as political advisers and congressmen. She said a highlight of these visits was a presentation at the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research office. “I thought, ‘Oh God, I really don’t know any of this stuff,’” Cotton said. “And as someone interested in pursuing a career in science, I thought it was definitely something that I should know and that others might think was important as well.” Students attended weekly preparation classes before the trip, Cotton said. The course featured speakers from various scientific and engineering disciplines who talked about funding and ethics in their particular fields. “We learned about the ethical and policy dilemmas of drug development for rare and neglected diseases,” Cotton said. “They affect such a small portion of the population that the FDA’s guidelines for study sample size, whether children should be included in trials and so on, have to be reconsidered.”center_img Twelve undergraduate and graduate students explored the ethics of scientific funding this spring break during a Center for Social Concerns (CSC) participated in an immersion experience in Washington, D.C.   The CSC offered the seminar, titled “Science Policy Ethics: Guiding Science through Regulation of Research and Funding,” for the first time this semester. It invited students in the science and engineering disciplines to learn more about the processes and policies behind the allotment of scientific funding by meeting with policymakers and officials firsthand. “Rachel had this great idea that science students could really benefit from a dose of policy because as scientists, we don’t create policy, but we inform it,” Crawford said. “By offering a small seminar in conjunction with the Center for Social Concerns, we could do just that and incorporate ethical aspects as well.” In July, Cotton and fellow junior biological science major Roger Smith pitched to Crawford the idea of creating a seminar to explore modes of and policies behind scientific research funding.last_img read more

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Professor receives awards

first_imgIn June, Theology professor Sr. Mary Catherine Hilkert did something nearly unprecedented: receiving both the Ann O’Hara Graff Memorial Award and the Veritas Award which focus on theological anthropology, fundamental theology and feminist theology and spirituality.  The Women’s Consultation in Constructive Theology of the Catholic Theological Society of America annually grants the Ann O’Hara Graff Memorial Award, which is named for a notable scholar who demonstrated the intersection of faith, scholarship and experience, Hilkert said.   “They are especially interested in some kind of woman-defined scholarship … scholarship and liberating action on behalf of women in the Church and in the broader community,” Hilkert said.  Hilkert said receiving the award was even more significant because she was nominated by her colleagues. Additionally, Ann O’Hara Graff was a friend and colleague of Hilkert’s – Graff also worked in the field of theological anthropology – which added even more significance to the award, Hilkert said. Hilkert said Graff was very accomplished despite her untimely death and she was honored to receive an award named for Graff. “She died in her mid-40s, and even by that time she had made marvelous contributions to integrating academic theology of the highest scholarship with people’s concrete lives and pastoral experience,” Hilkert said. “It meant a lot to be honored in her name.” Previous recipients of the award include Sr. Regina Coll, former director of Field Education in the theology department, who received the award in 1999, and Sr. Jamie Phelps, OP, a visiting professor this year in the theology department, who received the award in 2010.  The Dominican Colloquium on Higher Education awards the Veritas Award to Dominican scholars who are dedicated to preaching and teaching truth at an institution that is not sponsored by the order, Hilkert said.   “It reminded me of this tradition that I stand with the Dominican order,” she said. “That has been at the very heart of my own vocation, as a theologian, a teacher, a writer, a preacher.”  She said one reason she has been so dedicated to the Dominican order is the appreciation for academics alongside faith. “Another thing I love about the Dominican order, that I think both of these awards represent, is that academic study, not just theology, is considered part of our spirituality,” Hilkert said. “To be recognized both by the Dominicans and my theological colleagues was also very supportive to my own lifetime work as a student and a teacher of theology, and trying to mentor others in that field.” Hilkert said her time as a Dominican at Notre Dame, a Holy Cross-affiliated institution, has been marked by hospitality and a common understanding of the mission of the University.  “They appreciate the fact that the Dominican order has a long history of commitment to theological scholarship and scholarship more broadly – the search for truth, wherever it can be found,” she said. “I think there is a great appreciation of the multiple treasures in the Church.”last_img read more

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Speaker addresses Church’s stance on sexuality

first_imgSaint Mary’s College kicked off the Theology on Fire lecture series Wednesday night with a discussion titled “Questions on Sex,” led by religious studies professor Phyllis Kaminski. Kaminski said sex is an obvious topic of debate in the Catholic Church today, though sex and sexuality are not synonymous. “The Catechism will talk about sexuality and say that it affects all aspects of the human person in the unity of the body and soul, and it especially concerns the capacity to love and procreate,” she said. “In another place, the Catechism says that everyone, men and women, should acknowledge his or her sexual identity. It’s the conjugal acts, the homosexual acts, which get confusing sometimes.” Kaminski said she defines sex as fun, powerful and holy, and because of these three aspects, it is an extremely complicated expression. After this introduction, Kaminski initiated a question and answer session. Students’ questions addressed the Church’s stance on sexuality and the Church’s conception of sexual sin.   Kaminski said people, at any point in life, must decide for themselves what level of affection is appropriate to each stage of commitment. “There really isn’t one correct answer,” she said.  “In the Church, we say consult objective norms, look at the objective teachings of the Church, pray, talk to people who are wiser than you and trusted, and ultimately what you come to is you have to make a decision, and you make this decision in the best way you can. You can trust your conscience, but you also must inform it.” The degree to which people feel they need affection influences the mystery of human sexuality, Kaminski said. “The mystery of human sexuality is the mystery of our need to embrace others, sexually and spiritually,” she said. Kaminski quoted Pedro Arrupe to support her belief that people’s personal conscience should influence their choices in love. “Fall in love, stay in love, and it will decide everything,” she said. Junior Hannah Ziegeler said Kaminski’s introduction to the discussion was very thought provoking. “I thought the idea she posed of ‘how the most effective questions asked [about religion and sexuality] are those that cause us to question ourselves was enlightening,” Ziegeler said. “I think reflection is important, specifically when learning about sexuality where interpretation is subjective.” Junior Sarah Hossfeld said the series was unlike any discussion on Catholicism and sexuality that she had ever heard before. “I thought that [Kaminski] did a very good job of making the Church’s teachings not seem like strict, reproachful rules or laws,” Hossfeld said. “Instead, it’s very much about your conscience and your personal relationship with God, and these things can alter your own views of sexuality.”last_img read more

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Locals complete pilgrimage for immigration reform

first_imgTwo local parishes honored the feast of St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, the patron saint of immigrants, by organizing a pilgrimage from St. Adalbert’s Our Lady of Hungary parish to the Hesburgh Center at Notre Dame. Jesus Rivera, a parishioner of St. Adalbert’s, said members from these parishes met at St. Adalbert’s, drove to St. Joseph’s together, and then began the fifty-minute walk to Notre Dame. He said they recited the rosary and sang along the way. The group was welcomed to Notre Dame with food, music and prayer, Rivera said. Juan Rangel, chief of staff for Notre Dame Student Government said Rivera, the Notre Dame Institute for Latino Studies, Notre Dame students, and the Notre Dame Student Government collaborated to plan the event. “The goal of [the pilgrimage] is to place attention back on passing comprehensive immigration reform by using our strong Catholic faith to guide us in our walk,“Rangelsaid. He believes most of the parishioners of St. Adalbert’s are undocumented immigrants, making immigration reform a topic close to their hearts, Rivera said. “Things have changed [in regards to immigration]. We have made some progress, yes, but there are still some things that still need to be fixed. The justice piece of it is where we’re heading. Respect and dignity should be for everyone. …We hear the cries of the families. So many times we have heard of families torn apart. It becomes real at St. Adalbert’s,”Rivera said. Sean Long, co-president of College Democrats, said he sees immigration reform as more than a policy issue. “It’s a moral issue.  And we believe that a Catholic university like Notre Dame can play a leading role in making immigration reform a pillar on college campuses nationwide,”Long said. Long said a phone bank organized by the Student Coalition for Immigration Advocacy and Notre Dame’s College Democrats occurred at the same time as the pilgrimage. He said members of both organizations participated in making calls to Rep. Jackie Walorski [R-IN-2] to advocate for comprehensive immigration reform. Long said the phone bank was originally scheduled for next week, but they pushed it back to Wednesday at the suggestion of Faith in Public Life. According to their website, Faith in Public Life (FPL) is a strategy center for the faith community advancing faith in the public square as a powerful force for justice, compassion and the common good. The phone bank event included performances by Coro Primavera and MariachiND, Long said. After the participants finished their calls, they helped to welcome the parishioners in from their pilgrimage, Rivera said. Together, students and parishioners attended the first event in the “Transformative Latino Leadership Lecture Series.” Carlos Eire, a professor of history and religious studies at Yale University delivered the lecture. The two events united in their goals of advocating for immigration reform legislation, in honor of St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, Long said. Contact Kayla Mullen at kmullen2@nd.edulast_img read more

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Physicist analyzes ice skating

first_imgWhile Charlotte Elster’s day job is researching at the forefront of theoretical nuclear physics, her self-described “early day” job is figure skating. A physics professor at Ohio University, Elster gave a lecture Wednesday about the intersection of her two passions: the physics of ice skating.    As a physicist, Elster began with the most fundamental aspect of ice skating: the ice itself. Specifically, she addressed some common misconceptions about the reason ice is slippery, the exact cause of which was not confirmed until the early 2000s with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). “[In 1859] Michael Faraday postulated that a thin film of liquid covers the surface of the ice, even at temperatures well below freezing,” Elster said. “Michael Faraday had no STM, and no high-tech equipment, so it’s amazing what he said. All of this was neglected.” One of the reasons people believe liquid exists on the surface of the ice is because the pressure caused by the weight of a person concentrated on the skate blade causes the ice to melt, which turns out not to be the case, Elster said. The effect of this pressure on the temperature on the ice for a 50-kilogram person is only roughly 0.2 degrees Celsius. Elster said frictional melting could be a potential explanation, but found that rough calculations could only produce a 2.1 degree Celsius change in the temperature of the ice, not enough to melt ice in rinks that are generally kept between minus-seven and minus-eight degrees Celsius. The real cause of ice’s low frictional coefficient is the gradient of the crystalline structure of the individual molecules in a block of ice, Elster said. In the middle of the ice the same amount of material is present around an arbitrary crystal in the structure; whereas molecules toward the surface don’t have such a uniform environment and are looser. Macroscopic objects, such as skate blades, cannot cut through this microscopic layer to the more solid one, which is the cause of ice’s slipperiness, she said. Elster said the skater has a different perspective on this phenomenon. “If you put your entire skate perpendicular to the direction you want to go you can just push off this way,” Elster said. “So basically, your forward force is only your push force times sine of theta, so you don’t get everything. So this lies in the plane of the ice. You, as the skater, don’t want to lie in the plane of the ice. So, standing on the blade, you actually have another angle, namely the angle of the lean of your blade. If you’re 90 degrees, you’re just standing. Nothing happens.” Forward force, and hence much of movement on the ice, is essentially a function of these two angles, she said. “The interesting thing is that the mass of the skater never shows up,” Elster said. “That means that the little girl or the little boy and the 200-pound hockey player with all the gear have the same rules going.” The next stages of movement, the turns and fancy footwork, involve lots of torque and angular momentum, Elster said.   “You have a body box, which is your shoulder and your hips,” she said. “Ideally, if they stay straight you have a perfectly straight alignment. As soon as you twist, you create a torque.” From the skater’s view, a large part of spins and footwork is the fine control of motion, making small circles and keeping near-perfect balance. From the physicist’s view, this makes it attractive to model as a rigid body problem, Elster said.   After discussing turns and footwork, Elster did mathematical plots of projectile motion, examining different flight paths and times based on velocities and flight angle. She said ice skaters, regardless of initial velocity, angle and skill do not have a lot of time in the air. “They are below one second in the air,” she said. “The time in the air is actually not that great, so you have to do a lot of stuff in that short time.” As with spinning, the success of the jump depends on the smallest of physical details. Often, ice skaters will know if a jump will end poorly before they’re even in the air, she said. “The point is, in the jumps you have to make perfectly sure that you always jump up straight so that your rotation is on an axis perpendicular to the ice,” Elster said. “If you rotate on an axis non-perpendicular to the ice, the chance is that you’ll land bad.” She ended by talking about the most famous of all jumps in ice skating, the triple axel, and whether a quadruple axel is possible. Elster’s conclusion was that it probably was not possible because of the short airtime constraint, which, according to the physics, cannot be altered by anything in the jump itself. “That’s what we do as physicists,” Elster said. “We put in numbers and check it out. If in doubt, find out.” Contact Henry Gens at hgens@nd.edulast_img read more

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Student government launches new initiatives

first_imgElected last February and sworn into office in April, student body president Lauren Vidal and vice president Matt Devine, both seniors, have settled in and started implementing several of the initiatives they began last spring.At the end of last year, Vidal announced a new program, O’SNAP, or the Student Nighttime Auxiliary Patrol, which will enhance the SafeWalk program with two of what Vidal calls “state-of-the-art golf carts.” SafeWalk currently allows students to call Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) and receive escorts to their destinations free of charge.Vidal said she hopes O’SNAP will do more than revamp the existing SafeWalk program.“Eventually we’d like to replace the SafeWalk program entirely,” she said.Vidal said SafeWalk staff members will undergo training to drive the golf carts. Devine said SafeWalk employees, once trained, will drive the newly-purchased golf carts, which come fully equipped with seat belts, heating and a stereo system.“The first couple of weeks, O’SNAP may be operated by NDSP officers,” Devine said.Student government purchased the golf carts with funds left over from the previous administration, Vidal said. She said students can still use the previous SafeWalk system to request an escort.“Right now, the phone number to call is the SafeWalk number. Then the student will be connected to a dispatcher who will ask them where they are located, and can then provide an estimate [time] for their pick-up,” she said.For the foreseeable future, O’SNAP will operate exclusively on-campus, but Devine said he, Vidal and NDSP’s Sergeant Tracy Skibins plan to have the program up and running this weekend or early next week.Another initiative Vidal wanted to tackle last year was the student readership program, which provides free newspapers to on-campus students. She said student government had maintained the same system for several years and decided to explore other options.“We essentially stayed with the Gannett program, which sells a readership package to universities and colleges,” she said. “Our contract with them included USA Today, the New York Times and the South Bend Tribune… When we took office, we realized that there may be students who have opinions on the program.”Vidal and Devine eventually took the discussion to the student Senate, which informed them that many students wanted to read the Wall Street Journal, particularly because individual subscriptions cost more than those to other newspapers and because many business professors encourage their students to read the Wall Street Journal daily, according to an April 10 article in The Observer.“We were fortunate enough to go through a negotiation process with the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, and we have signed two new contracts with each publication,” Vidal said. “This is the first time we will have brought the Wall Street Journal to campus.”Additionally, Vidal decided that to save money, student government opted not to pay the companies to deliver the papers to their individual on-campus distribution sites, but instead chose to do a bulk drop.With the saved money, student government will instead pay students to deliver the papers to these sites each morning. According to Devine, they hope to employ two or three students who will work in rotations. This week, Vidal and Devine will deliver the papers to the dining halls themselves, “to determine how long it will take and how much we should pay them,” Devine said.“We’re hoping to announce the job opening at the end of the week,” Vidal said, “I’m so glad we’ve been able to create what will be a steady, easy job.”Starting this week, 400 copies of each newspaper will be available in both dining halls, LaFortune Student Center and the Mendoza College of Business.Devine said a third new initiative will give students easy access to local products for one day this fall.“We’re already pretty far underway with preparations for quad markets, which will bring area farmer’s markets to campus,” Devine said. “We’re looking to have it the Friday before a home game in October, and we already have several companies looking to partner with us. It will be almost run as a sort of harvest festival.”Looking ahead, Vidal said her goal for the year “is to take conversations that have been happening around campus in the last couple of years and make them practical and tangible.”Tags: O’SNAP, quad markets, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Journalist examines post-colonial nationalism

first_imgArgentinian journalist Sergio Kiernan explored the similarities and differences in the colonial experience and subsequent national identity of each of the three countries in his “Post-colonial Identity and the Idea of Nationhood: Argentina, Brazil and Ireland” lecture Friday.Kiernan, a writer for the Argentinian magazine “Pagina 12,” contrasted his experience at the celebration of the last year’s centennial celebrations of the Easter Rising in Ireland — his ancestral home — with expressions of patriotism in his native Western Hemisphere.“The spotlight was on the volunteers that fought and sacrificed for the nation,” Kiernan said. “The Irish idea of nation is popular: a small, simple, easygoing nation. This is odd, because European patriotism slides into nationalism quickly.”Kiernan said there are various examples of European patriotism including palaces, symbols and military displays, and the nations of the Americas then inherited this kind of patriotism.“Washington is always shown crushing an enemy, and the U.S. is represented as an eagle,” he said. “In Argentina, it is the same thing with General Jose de San Martin, the great liberator of Argentina, Chile and Peru.”Kiernan said San Martin is an example of how myths are formulated.“The Argentine government asked a French painter for several portraits of San Martin,” he said. “The painter always showed him riding a white horse, so now everyone thinks that he rode a white horse.”According to Kiernan, national myths in Argentina were magnified in the late 19th century by a huge influx of immigrants to the country.“By the 1910 census, half of the population was foreign born,” he said. “The government was worried that if it didn’t do something, then the nation would be an archipelago of foreign communities.”Kiernan said Brazil demonstrates the potentially racial elements of nationalism. According to Kiernan, a painting depicting the Grito de Ipiranga — the moment when Brazil declared independence from Portugal — is idealized, with only white bystanders despite the fact that the Brazilian population during that time was 85 percent black.The government found its solution in an increased emphasis on nationalism in schools, he said. According to Kiernan, the Argentinian school year runs from March to December, a period that conveniently contains many anniversaries of the Revolution.Kiernan said the government celebrates these anniversaries during the school year, choosing students to carry the national flag into the school while their companions stood at attention.According to Kiernan, depictions of the 1916 Easter Uprising in Ireland emphasized the volunteers who took to the streets and rarely showed leaders of the rebellion — and, if they did appear, they were never in uniform or on horseback. He said this emphasis may derive from the recent nature of the rebellion, given that it was only 100 years ago.“The Irish rebellion is unique because it was the reawakening of a people,” he said. “The Irish as a people almost died out because of British colonization and emigration, and many patriots felt they were creating a new Ireland.”Tags: Argentina, Brazil, Hesburgh Center for International Studies, identity, Ireland, nationalism, Sergio Kiernanlast_img read more

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Office of Housing gathers student, rector feedback on residential life

first_imgFollowing the announcement of a new housing policy in the fall that students are to live on campus for six semesters, many students began to examine their residential life experience and express concerns. In order to address some of the issues raised, the Office of Residential Life has been working with students and rectors to consider a potential waiver process and improve other aspects of dorm life.Margaret Morgan, director of residential life, said the Office of Housing’s most recent initiatives have focused on student input.“I think we’ve really taken a posture of listening and trying to hear the student experience to figure out what’s important to students and then think through ways that we can continue to make the student experience in the residence halls better,” she said.Throughout this process, the Office of Housing has met with several student groups to examine ways to improve the dorm experience, most recently to explore the possibility of a waiver system exempting students from the six-semester housing policy.While some students said they would prefer to meet with an administrator to discuss their reasons for wanting to move off campus, others are concerned that this process would force students to relive traumatic experiences. Morgan said administrators hope to take all of these responses into account and develop the most “student-friendly” waiver system possible.“I think what I have heard mostly from [students] is this desire to protect students’ stories, to help continue to hold them sacred — to really feel like it’s not a cumbersome process so that a student doesn’t have to go through a lot of paperwork or jump through a lot of hoops to make this request, but also really respects where a student is coming from,” Morgan said. “ … And I think what we have said, too, is our commitment is to really honor each person.”The Office of Housing has been gathering feedback to examine other aspects of residential life, in particular the consistency of protocols amongst the various dorms. To this end, Morgan and Fr. Matt Kuczora — rector of Dunne Hall — chaired a committee of rectors and members of the Office of Housing. In addition to his work on the committee, Kuczora also conducted a survey amongst rectors.These initiatives revealed differences between certain dorm policies, results Kuczora said he sometimes found surprising.“Something I didn’t expect, too, from some of that response was that there are differences [in policies], like the way that dances run across the board,” Kuczora said. “That was a really interesting thing and I didn’t really know because I don’t go to a lot of other halls’ dances.”Though there is a common conception that men’s and women’s dorms operate differently, these varying policies do not always manifest themselves along gendered lines, Kuczora said.“A lot of the results we’ve gotten initially haven’t been defined along ‘women’s halls do x and men’s halls do y,’” he said. “There are some men’s halls that do the ‘x’ and some women’s halls who do the ‘y.’ That was surprising too, to have this really good data that it’s not that cut and dry, like is often the narrative.”By gathering information on these policies, Morgan said, the Office of Housing hopes to identify the “hallmarks” of residential life: consistent expectations and resources each student can anticipate while living in a dorm.“It’s more saying, ‘What can we guarantee that every student on a baseline experience and absolutely have available to them and absolutely go through the halls having?’” Morgan said. “So what are these hallmarks of our residential communities that we can say confidently, whether you live in Cavanaugh or whether you live in Dunne or Fisher that I know for sure you’re going to have available to you?”The Office of Housing will continue to gather feedback throughout the rest of the semester, through four different student “listening sessions” as well as Friday office hours with the directors of residential life. Morgan said she would encourage students to come to these meetings and voice their concerns with administrators.“I think a big part of this that we’ve realized is students don’t often know that we’re listening,” Morgan said. “So talk to your rectors, talk to the directors of residential life, talk to members of the office of housing operations. … We want to know and we want to hear things because if we don’t know — and I think this is a part of it, too — if people just decide to move off campus because they’re frustrated and never tell us why, then we can’t make it better. So we’re here. We’re listening. We care. Take us up on it and tell us so we can really dive in and see what’s going on.”Tags: Housing policy, Housing Policy Change, Office of Housing, residential life, six-semester requirement, waiver systemlast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s women gather for pajama-themed karaoke night

first_imgMamma Mia and *NSYNC tracks blasted from the basement of Saint Mary’s Student Center on Thursday at Karaoke Night hosted by the College’s Resident Hall Association (RHA) events committee.The night was pajama themed, and girls gathered with their friends in slippers and matching pajama sets waiting for their turn to sing. In addition to karaoke, women could enter their names in a raffle for the chance to win a variety of prizes, junior and vice committee president Nicole McCaffery said.The RHA events committee receives funds for all its different events, and the group decided to allocate a large sum of the money for Karaoke Night.“We get a fund every year, and this semester we got a really big one, so we were able to get bigger gifts,” McCaffery said. The RHA events committee has hosted events like this in the past and Bella Escobedo, junior and RHA events president, said the group hopes these events bring the College’s community together.“We love getting the community together, and we love having the girls bond and have a lot of fun,” she said. “Last year we did a similar Halloween karaoke event. This karaoke night is actually an annual event that the events committee puts on. In the fall we hosted Trunk or Treat, and we had the faculty bring their kids in for that.”The events committee teamed up with RHA for the event with volunteers running the night.“The RHA events committee and the other RHA executive board also comes and helps out,” McCaffery said. “They come and volunteer for the different shifts throughout the event, so they’ll help with the set-up and tear down and things in between.”McCaffery said Karaoke Night required a significant amount of planning, but she enjoyed the preparations. “I think it’s fun to decorate and get people together,” she said. “Everyone has a certain job that they like to do for these events. Some people like to do the decorations, some people like to just brainstorm and come up with the ideas for what to do for the event, so it’s just fun to get everyone together and to create this event and to get a bunch of girls from the Saint Mary’s community to come together and hang out.”McCaffery said the committee welcomed women who have attended their events in the past and women who haven’t had the chance to come to their events before.“I came because I heard there was going to be karaoke and mozzarella sticks, but yeah we all came with friends and wanted to be a part of the social aspect of it all,” first year Lexi Trombly said. “We usually just hang out in our room, so we wanted to come out to an event.”McCaffery said the RHA events committee will continue to foster community through campus-wide events.“It’s like a sisterhood. You really have that and can meet new people — even though it’s a small campus, you meet new people every year,” McCaffery said. “We grow as an organization with the events, so we’re able to change them and improve every year, so I think it’s homier compared to other colleges. We’re like a family, and I really like that.”Tags: Community, Residence Hall Association, Singinglast_img read more

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August Jobs Report: 1.4 Million Added

first_imgMr. Blue MauMau / Flickr / CC BY 2.0 WASHINGTON – August saw an additional 1.4 million jobs added in the United States, but the country is still a long way off from regaining the amount lost since the start of the Coronavirus pandemic.The numbers released on Friday show the economy is recovering slowly, but in line with expectations.Last month’s jobs were less than the 1.7 added in July.America is still down 11 point five million from February, before COVID-19 caused the country to shut down virtually everything. One bright spot, the unemployment rate dipped below 10 percent for the first time since March and it was recorded at 8.4 percent. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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