Category: octvpcjc

Phish’s Jon Fishman Calls Donald Trump A “F**king Sociopath” And Pledges To Vote For Hillary Clinton

first_imgFor many months, few musicians campaigned as fiercely for Bernie Sanders than Phish drummer Jon Fishman. Fishman viewed Sanders as an actual hope for positive change, and even donned a Fishman-themed dress on summer tour, which perhaps made Hillary Clinton’s nomination as the Democratic Party nominee that much more heartbreaking for him. Now, with Election Day approaching tomorrow, Fishman has shared his thoughts on the two leading candidates with confidence.In a Facebook post, Fish puts it out forthright that he doesn’t like Clinton, but finds her a significantly better option than her opponent Donald Trump. “Trump really is a fucking sociopath and that’s nothing to trifle with,” says Fishman, encouraging people to vote for Hillary Clinton with him.Read the full message below:Ok, look. We’re all confused sometimes. Lord knows I’ve waffled on all this stuff since Bernie dropped out. I’m not an idiot. I know a vote for Bernie is purely symbolic and is essentially a waste. I also know that either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump is going to be our next president, and as disgusted as I am by that choice the reality is we are once again handed the lesser of two evils scenarioIt’s particularly upsetting this time around because I believe we really had a chance to vote for a good candidate in Sanders, and we blew it. It’s just so tough to get that tease of having a candidate who represents real positive change for the most people get yanked away only to throw us back into the pit of painfully slow, incremental change that may or may not occur depending on how much the president is willing to actually work for and do what they say they will, or is even telling the truth in the first place, which in Hillary’s case is probably not much.Who knows what she really stands for, what parts of the Democratic Party platform she’ll actually work to fulfill, just pay lip service to, or flat out ignore? Who knows? It sucks, but that’s the best the DNC was willing to offer.What I do know is this though: As shitty an option as Clinton is, Trump is, as one person put it, “a national emergency and sometimes you don’t have a choice of who you have to get in a life boat with, you just hope they can row”. That sentiment, at the end of the day really hits home for me.Also, The Democratic Party platform, regardless of how much of it Clinton will actually represent, is endlessly, infinitely better than the Republican Party platform which is a straight up “fuck you” to the whole country on so many levels I can’t even get into here. Just go read it for yourself and see if you can get through the first couple parts of the agenda without wanting to puke. It’s a joke.So, regardless of who cares what I think or not, for my own conscience, just in case anyone actually would be influenced by what I say because I’m a rock star, which is the stupidest reason to care, but whatever…just in case, I’m retracting my earlier tirade from a few days ago and confessing that I am going to cast my vote, however disappointedly or reluctantly, for Clinton, because Trump really is a fucking sociopath and that’s nothing to trifle with.If he were to actually become President I would have a harder time knowing that I may have contributed to that in even the tiniest way. That would be harder for me to swallow than even the disappointment and anger I felt over Bernie getting shafted.So, if what I’m saying makes sense to you, vote accordingly. If it doesn’t, vote accordingly. Just vote.Have a good day.[H/T Relix]last_img read more

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$12.5M establishes Transforming Public Health Education Initiative Fund

first_img Read Full Story A major effort underway at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) to redesign its educational strategy has received significant new support of $12.5 million from the Charina Endowment Fund and Richard L. (MBA ’59) and Ronay Menschel of New York City.The Transforming Public Health Education Initiative Fund will support development of innovative materials, technologies and approaches required to redesign the master’s degree program for health professionals and to develop a new leadership doctorate in public health.  The innovations will also benefit other graduate degree programs at the School as part of an overall effort to better prepare 21st century students to achieve maximum impact in their careers.The $12.5 million will underwrite efforts by the HSPH faculty to infuse the educational experience at HSPH with more case-based and field-based “real world” learning opportunities. It will also accelerate efforts at the School to develop “flipped classroom” experiences, in which lecture-style material is delivered increasingly online before class, while classroom time is spent by students and faculty actively engaging together to develop strategies for solving the types of problems students will encounter in their careers.The fund will support the development of revised and enhanced master’s level curricula to be made available to students in 2015, and a new Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) degree that the School will offer for the first time beginning in 2014.  Both degrees will continue and strengthen the HSPH tradition of preparing students for leadership careers in public health.last_img read more

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Soft robots for all

first_img Related A soft touch Powered by a chemical reaction controlled by microfluidics, 3D-printed ‘octobot’ has no electronics Soft robots can’t always compete with the hard. Their rigid brethren dominate assembly lines, perform backflips, dance to “Uptown Funk,” fly, dive, and walk through volcanoes.But each year, soft robots gain new abilities. They’ve learned to jump, squirm, and grip. And they can handle tomatoes without bruising the fruit, emerge unscathed after being run over by a car, and journey through radiation, disaster zones, and outer space, all without the challenges facing their harder peers. For people and animals, they have a “cooperative function”: a soft touch.Recently, researchers in the lab of George M. Whitesides, the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, have invented soft replacements for the last hard parts required to build a robot. Instead of electricity and wires, pressurized air expands and contracts rubber inflatables to create movement, soft valves take over for the hard, and soft digital logic replicates the same capabilities of an electronic computer.Now, postdoctoral scholar Daniel J. Preston’s latest innovations give these robots new, complex movements. As first author on a study published late last month in Science Robotics, he introduces the first soft ring oscillator, which gives these machines the ability to roll, undulate, sort, measure liquids, and swallow.“It’s another tool in the toolkit to make these smart, soft robots without any electronics, and without any hard valves,” Preston says.Until now, ring oscillators were made with electronic transistors or microfluidics. Electronics always require hard components. Most microfluidics do, too. Many use glass for their pressurized water or air systems. Preston’s macroscale pneumatic ring oscillator relies on inverters and air. They manipulate the air pressure in his robot’s rubber tubes: If the input is high pressure, the output will be low pressure, and vice versa. When three or other odd numbers of gates are connected in a ring, one gate’s shift triggers the next, which triggers the next, and on and on.“The cool response that you get when you combine an odd number of these inverters in a loop is an instability that travels around the loop,” Preston says. He likens it to a Slinky that collapses in order to spring down a flight of stairs, creating a constant pace without the need for another push.To test what the soft ring oscillator could do, Preston and his team created five prototypes. Each uses a single, constant source of air pressure to run three pneumatic actuators (the inverters).,One prototype nudges a ball around a ring. Another undulates a stage to keep beads of two different sizes rolling against the edge. Eventually, all the smaller beads fall through a hole in the side of the stage. They sort themselves out.“The ring oscillator is really good for things like rolling motions,” Preston says. Rolling requires coordination of several actions in time. A single input and output will not suffice. For example, to get their hexagonal foam robot to roll forward, the ring oscillator helps inflate a balloon behind the robot and deflate one in front at the exact same time. The coordinated push-and-release shifts the hexagon forward again and again as the balloons inflate and deflate in perfect sync.Yet another prototype provides a more tangible purpose. A textile-based sleeve, wrapped around the lower leg and secured with Velcro, exerts coordinated pressure, “pumping” fluid up the leg. According to recent studies, this pumping motion improves symptoms of lymphedema and chronic venous disease better than simple compression. The device could also help nurses, waiters, and police officers prevent deep-vein thrombosis, a result of working long shifts on tired feet.Before they start clinical trials for the sleeve, the team wants to gauge interest. If enough people crave a softer, less-expensive way to alleviate and prevent symptoms, the product might find a big enough market to merit further research.The low cost of Preston’s materials — rubber-like silicone elastomers — make them ideal for more than just inexpensive home care. Biocompatible, disposable, gentle, and sterile versions could be used for lab experiments, drug delivery, or even medical devices inside the body like a sleeve that helps the heart beat that was developed by Harvard and Boston Children’s Hospital researchers. Preston’s final prototype can sort three different colored liquids based on a predetermined sequence and time, a tool that could prove useful for chemists.Preston expects his innovation to result in far more applications than the ones he demonstrated in his five prototypes. Since the paper explains how to replicate and customize the design, he hopes other labs will find even more uses. “People can use the soft ring oscillator for a lot of different applications in soft robotics, some of which we may not have even thought of or envisioned yet.”The research was funded by Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials Science and Engineering (ER45852); National Science Foundation (IIS-11317744), NSF MRSEC (DMR-1420570); Harvard University Mobility Scheme; U.S. Department of Defense, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program; National GEM Fellowship. The first autonomous, entirely soft robot Pneumatic digital logic eliminates the last hard components from robots The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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Professor receives awards

first_imgIn June, Theology professor Sr. Mary Catherine Hilkert did something nearly unprecedented: receiving both the Ann O’Hara Graff Memorial Award and the Veritas Award which focus on theological anthropology, fundamental theology and feminist theology and spirituality.  The Women’s Consultation in Constructive Theology of the Catholic Theological Society of America annually grants the Ann O’Hara Graff Memorial Award, which is named for a notable scholar who demonstrated the intersection of faith, scholarship and experience, Hilkert said.   “They are especially interested in some kind of woman-defined scholarship … scholarship and liberating action on behalf of women in the Church and in the broader community,” Hilkert said.  Hilkert said receiving the award was even more significant because she was nominated by her colleagues. Additionally, Ann O’Hara Graff was a friend and colleague of Hilkert’s – Graff also worked in the field of theological anthropology – which added even more significance to the award, Hilkert said. Hilkert said Graff was very accomplished despite her untimely death and she was honored to receive an award named for Graff. “She died in her mid-40s, and even by that time she had made marvelous contributions to integrating academic theology of the highest scholarship with people’s concrete lives and pastoral experience,” Hilkert said. “It meant a lot to be honored in her name.” Previous recipients of the award include Sr. Regina Coll, former director of Field Education in the theology department, who received the award in 1999, and Sr. Jamie Phelps, OP, a visiting professor this year in the theology department, who received the award in 2010.  The Dominican Colloquium on Higher Education awards the Veritas Award to Dominican scholars who are dedicated to preaching and teaching truth at an institution that is not sponsored by the order, Hilkert said.   “It reminded me of this tradition that I stand with the Dominican order,” she said. “That has been at the very heart of my own vocation, as a theologian, a teacher, a writer, a preacher.”  She said one reason she has been so dedicated to the Dominican order is the appreciation for academics alongside faith. “Another thing I love about the Dominican order, that I think both of these awards represent, is that academic study, not just theology, is considered part of our spirituality,” Hilkert said. “To be recognized both by the Dominicans and my theological colleagues was also very supportive to my own lifetime work as a student and a teacher of theology, and trying to mentor others in that field.” Hilkert said her time as a Dominican at Notre Dame, a Holy Cross-affiliated institution, has been marked by hospitality and a common understanding of the mission of the University.  “They appreciate the fact that the Dominican order has a long history of commitment to theological scholarship and scholarship more broadly – the search for truth, wherever it can be found,” she said. “I think there is a great appreciation of the multiple treasures in the Church.”last_img read more

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Rediscover Herbs

first_imgIf you grow herbs in the vegetable garden, you need only a small section to produceenough for your family.Most of the better-known herbs are easily grown in Georgia. A warm site with fullsunlight and good drainage is best. Most Georgia soils will produce excellent herbs ifthey till easily and drain well.Medium-fertile soils will produce leaves with peak aroma and flavor, the traits youtreasure in culinary herbs. Too much nitrogen or manure will add lush growth and subtractaroma.Any good way to fertilize and/or add organic matter to grow vegetables will be fine togrow herbs. The soil pH should be around 6.5. Two poundsof 5-10-10 per 100 square feet before planting should be ample.Have the soil tested before you plant an herb garden. Your county agent can give youexact recommendations.Grow any annual herb and some perennials from seed. Sow seed in flats indoors in late winter or early spring, so seedlings can beready to transplant when spring weather permits.Always plant anise, chervil, coriander, dill and fennel where you want them to grow.They’re hard to transplant.Sow caraway, parsley and lovage in late spring where they are to grow. First work thesoil to a fine consistency and wet it down. Plant the seed in shallow drills and coverlightly with soil.Press the seed row down with the back of a rake. Water carefully with a fine spray tokeep seeds constantly moist. Once they’ve germinated, slowly reduce watering until plantsare well-established. Herbs, and access to where they grew, once raised riches for spice-hungry nations. Theymay not be kingdom builders now, but they’re hugely popular.People are rediscovering the many ways herbs can enhance their lives, from their foodsto their landscapes.The variety of herbs home gardeners have today wouldonce have been unimaginable. But if you’re a beginner, start by learning to grow about a dozen. The culinary herbs will be the most rewarding.Besides furnishing flavors for the kitchen, culinary herbs canadd beauty and fragrance in the home or garden. Arrange them in flower beds,borders and rock gardens.Most herbs require full sun, although some will grow well in light shadein the South.You may use many attractive designs for an herb planting area. Parsley, chive and bothpurple and dwarf basil make attractive borders.Separate the perennial and annual herbs because the annual bed will have to be redoneeach year. Renew perennials after two to three years. Draw up a >gardenplan first and label plants when you set them out. Mix small-seeded herbs such as sweet marjoram, balm, summer and winter savory,thymes, and catnip with fine vermiculite or sand to distribute them better.Sow larger seeds directly. Space them more thinly and cover them with about aquarter-inch of soil.Grow mints, pennyroyal, tarragon and chives from divisions or cuttings. Rosemary, lemonbalm and lavender seeds germinate slowly and may do better in a greenhouse.Grow winter and summer savories, sages, thymes and mints from seed or by layering. Pegdown branches, still attached to the main plant, at a joint and cover them with an inch orso of soil. After roots are well-formed at the joints a few weeks later, cut off thebranches and transplant each newly rooted part.Mints spread fast and often need restraining. Use a sheet of tin around the edge tokeep them confined.After herbs are established, keep weeds under control. An organic mulch helps keep downweeds and conserve moisture. Water only in severe drought, since most herbs can withstanddry weather.last_img read more

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Indonesian Quake Toll At 1,100, Thousands Missing

first_imgBy Dialogo September 30, 2009 As rescue workers searched for survivors in the wreckage of a four-story school Thursday, Mira Utami’s mother clawed away, too — looking for the shoes missing from her daughter’s body. Mira was taking a high school English final when the quake hit, flattening the school in seconds and killing her a week before her 16th birthday. “We had planned to celebrate … but she’s gone,” said her mother, Malina, weeping amid the wreckage where the barefoot body was found. John Holmes, the U.N.’s humanitarian chief, set the death toll at 1,100, and the number was expected to grow. Government figures put the number of dead at 777, with at least 440 people seriously injured. Wednesday’s 7.6-magnitude earthquake started at sea and quickly rippled through Sumatra, the westernmost island in the Indonesian archipelago. An eerie quiet settled over Padang late Thursday as workers called off search efforts for the night. Thousands are thought trapped under shattered buildings in the city of 900,000, raising fears of a significantly higher death toll when the debris is cleared. “Let’s not underestimate. Let’s be prepared for the worst,” President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono said in the capital, Jakarta, before flying to Padang, a coastal city and West Sumatra province’s capital. President Barack Obama, who spent part of his childhood in Indonesia, pledged to support earthquake recovery efforts there as well as providing assistance in the South Pacific countries of Samoa and American Samoa, which were hit by a deadly tsunami Tuesday. Most of the confirmed deaths in Indonesia were reported in Padang where more than 500 buildings were severely damaged or flattened. Where a mall once stood was a heap of concrete slabs layered like pancakes with iron rods jutting out. Police and army rescue teams used bulldozers, backhoes and electric drills to clear the wreckage in intermittent rain, or climbed the hills of rubble to dislodge pieces of concrete with bare hands. Relatives of the missing gathered outside ruined buildings, hoping to hear good news. But mostly, the rescuers found bodies. Occasionally, they saved lives. A Singaporean, John Lee, was pulled alive from the Maryani hotel after surviving under the rubble for 25 hours. Rescue workers, responding to his cries for help, dug for 12 hours to free him. Lee suffered only a broken leg. One of the hospitals in the town had collapsed completely while the state-run Djamil Hospital was partly damaged — its walls cracked and windows broken. Staff at the hospital treated the injured in tents set up in the open. In another area, rows of yellow body bags were laid out in rows. Mira, a sophomore, was taking an end-of-term English exam along with dozens of classmates at the Indonesia-America Institute when the ground shook so severely that the tremors were felt in neighboring Malaysia and Singapore. Her father Zul rushed to the school, but it was already a heap of concrete when he got there. Still, he pulled at the slabs and managed to save two other children and an adult, his wife said. She said rescuers found their daughter’s body much later, but her feet were bare. “We are in a shock,” sobbed Malina, wearing her daughter’s brown veil and seeking other items to keep her connected to the girl. “We had planned to celebrate Utami’s 16th birthday on Oct. 7. Now I don’t know what we will do.” Zul was more philosophical. “I regret I couldn’t save her,” he said, “but I have to accept that as her destiny.” The school building’s construction was typical of the region, which is located in one of the poorest countries in the world. Most buildings are not made to withstand earthquakes, and even the tough ones were badly damaged in an earthquake in 2007. There is virtually no enforcement of building regulations in Indonesia, a nation of 235 million people prone to natural and man-made disasters. Indonesia sits on a major geological fault zone and experiences dozens of quakes every year. A 6.8 magnitude quake shook Sumatra on Thursday but there were no reports of deaths. Both quakes originated on the fault line that spawned the 2004 Asian tsunami that killed 230,000 people in a dozen nations. Wednesday’s quake was the deadliest since May 2006, when more than 3,000 people died in the city of Yugyakarta. SurfAid, a New Zealand-based medical aid group, said its program director, David Lange, narrowly escaped death when he fled the Ambacang Hotel in Padang just minutes before it collapsed. At least 80 people were missing in the five-story hotel, paramedics said. “People are trapped and screaming for help but they are below huge slabs which will take heavy equipment to move,” Lange was quoted as saying in a statement by SurfAid. “I saw dozens of the biggest buildings collapsed in town. Most of the damage is concentrated in the commercial center market, which was fully packed,” he said. Finance minister Sri Mulyani said the government has allocated $25 million for a two-month emergency response. She said the earthquake will seriously affect Indonesia’s economic growth, because West Sumatra is a main producer of crude palm oil. “This region has been damaged seriously, including its infrastructure,” Mulyani said.last_img read more

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Bad bosses drive talent away

first_img 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Kathryn MayerThere’s a lot of talk about talent management in the workplace. But there’s often disagreement on identifying the problems plaguing it.But Mark Allen, a business management professor at Pepperdine University, HCI senior faculty member and author, said he can sum up the issue in one word: Managers.“The single biggest problem in management is creating a class of managers who are ill-suited for the job,” Allen said during a session Wednesday at the HCI Human Capital Summit.And that all has had a very bad domino effect on the rest of the workforce. continue reading »last_img read more

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Giving back: It’s about people, purpose and perseverance

first_imgToday, leading companies drive success when they inspire employees to share, support and believe in a common purpose. They stay focused on their customers. They innovate, and they strive to make a positive impact on the world around us.These all matter to the purpose-driven company, but don’t underestimate the value of corporate giving. It matters for many reasons, and it can have a significant impact on your business. In fact, more and more research now shows socially responsible companies have more loyal customers who can drive stronger business results.Whether you value corporate giving for business reasons – or because it’s simply the right thing to do – I can tell you it’s definitely worth the investment. I can also tell you about three trends that have helped us continue our strong, dedicated program for giving back: continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Tips for picking the perfect Christmas tree and maintaining it throughout the holiday

first_imgOwner of Sunny Hill Tree Farm Mike Kodey has been selling Christmas trees for decades. He said a good trick to tell how freshly cut your tree is is to slide a branch through your hands and see how many needles you end up with in your palm. If you end up with lots of needles in your hand, the tree isn’t as freshly cut. Once your tree is home, Kodey recommended keeping it in the garage overnight to melt off the snow and dry out before bringing it inside. When it comes to picking out your tree, he said before you head out, measure your ceiling height for the room your tree is going in. “If they are down there having a good time and they get the ugliest tree on the farm, they’re enjoying it, I’m glad they got it,” said Kodey. TOWN OF UNION (WBNG) — 12 News spoke with a local Christmas tree expert Thursday who shared all the tips for picking out your tree and maintaining it this holiday.center_img When it comes to picking the perfect size or shape, he said it’s really up to the customer, some prefer shorter, taller, wider or thinner. When it comes to types of trees, Kodey recommended firs over spruces. He said this type has soft, short needles that stay on the tree for a long time. Once your tree is ready to be brought inside, cut a half an inch off the bottom to open the pores of the tree. This will allow more water to come in, keeping the tree fresh. After you have your tree in its tree stand, make sure you give your tree plenty of lukewarm, tap water, keeping the bottom wet at all times.last_img read more

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American Legion 1700 hosts Memorial Day parade

first_imgPost 1700 will hold a chicken BBQ from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday. Those attending the parade practiced social-distancing measures and remained inside their vehicles. ENDICOTT (WBNG) — The Endicott American Legion honored those who served our country Monday morning with a parade.center_img The vehicle parade started at American Legion Post 1700 and traveled to George F. Johnson Memorial then through the streets of West Endicott and back to post 1700.last_img

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