Category: kmbmchox

Why The Mishawaka Amphitheatre Is One Of The Most Coveted Scenic Venues In The Country

first_imgLoad remaining images As with places like The Gorge in George, WA, or Red Rocks Amphitheatre, this particular venue should be on any true music lover’s concert bucket list. The Mish provides a certain, special kind of atmosphere that is simply impossible to put into words, and we can’t wait to share in that magic at Canyon Jam this fall!Tickets for Canyon Jam are currently on-sale here. For show updates and additional information, join the Facebook Event page.The Mishawaka also provides round-trip shuttle service for patrons from downtown Fort Collins for $20. Reservations are recommended, as on-site parking is extremely limited. Shuttle tickets and can be purchased here.Canyon Jam Friday Schedule:6pm – Doors8pm – 9pm – Moves at Midnight9:30pm – 10:30pm – Mungion11pm – 1am – Main SqueezeCanyon Jam Saturday Schedule:4pm – Doors6pm – 6:40pm Jus Sayin’7pm – 8pm – Cycles8:30 – 9:30pm – Organ Freeman10 pm – 11:30pm – Aqueous12am – 2am – Spafford– SHOW INFO –Artist/s:  Canyon Jam w/ Spafford, The Main Squeeze, Aqueous, Organ Freeman, Mungion, Cycles, Moves At Midnight, Jus’ Sayin’Date/s:   Friday, September 8th & Saturday, September 9th, 2017Venue:    Mishawaka Amphitheatre (13714 Poudre Canyon Rd, Bellvue, CO 80512)Ages:Doors:     6pm Friday / 4pm SaturdayMusic:     8pm Friday / 6pm SaturdayTickets:   $15adv / $20dos / Limited 2-Day passes @ $25 (purchase tickets here)[photo credit to Sunny Side Production] The first-ever Canyon Jam is set to take place in Bellevue, CO from September 8th-9th. With nationally-known touring outfits Spafford, The Main Squeeze, Aqueous, Mungion, Organ Freeman and Colorado-based acts Cycles, Moves at Midnight, and Jus’ Sayin’ on the lineup, the inaugural event promises an unforgettable weekend of funk and jams. But while the red-hot artist roster is surely nothing to scoff at, the true star of the show at Canyon Jam will be the venue itself: the storied Mishawaka Amphitheatre.Founded in 1916, “The Mish” is an iconic outdoor venue that sits along the banks of Colorado’s Cache la Poudre River, offering breathtaking views of its serene surroundings. The river, whose French name translates to English as “hide the powder,” earned its title from an incident in the 1820s when French trappers caught in a snowstorm were forced to bury the gun powder they were carrying with them along the river bank.True to the heritage of its Cache la Poudre River Valley locale, the Mishawaka Amphitheatre has hosted some truly explosive concerts over the years. The 100-year-old venue has seen performances by The String Cheese Incident, The Disco Biscuits, Buckethead, Bela Fleck & the Flecktones, Medeski, Martin, and Wood, George Clinton, Sound Tribe Sector Nine, Leon Russell, Joan Baez, and a long list of other iconic artists.While it may be a trek to get to the remote venue, seeing your favorite bands  in the middle of the mountains with nothing but nature as far as the eye can see is a truly moving and memorable experience that every music lover should get the chance to enjoy.The natural backdrop of the surrounding mountains and the river–which quite literally flows directly behind the stage–help give shows at The Mish an utterly awe-inspiring vibe. On any given day, you can look across the river and witness big horn sheep, elk and even the occasional bear (a very rare occurrence) meandering through the hills; all while enjoying an incredible musical experience in The Great Outdoors.last_img read more

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Smoky Run Music Festival Taps Gov’t Mule, Railroad Earth, & More For Inaugural Lineup

first_imgToday, the new Smoky Run Music Festival has announced the lineup for their inaugural event 2019, which will take place from June 28th through 30th in Butler, Ohio. According to organizers, the event is “set up across the sprawling, rolling hills of the Clear Fork Adventures Resort” and will feature headlining performances from Gov’t Mule, Trampled By Turtles, and Railroad Earth.The impressive first-year lineup also includes Deer Tick, Son Volt, Sierra Hull, The Travelin’ McCourys, Jeff Austin Band, The Travelin’ McCourys and Jeff Austin Band present The Grateful Ball, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades, and Rumpke Mountain Boys.Also performing the inaugural Smoky Run Music Festival are The Way Down Wanderers, Ekoostik Hookah, Sarah Shook & The Disarmers, Dead Winter Carpenters, The Wooks, Old Salt Union, Chicago Farmer, Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound, Rachel Baiman, Rev. Jeff Mosier, Ben Danaher, Michigan Rattlers, Young Heirlooms, Sugar Creek Bluegrass, and Grassinine.As the new festival further notes,Located between Columbus (1 hour) and Cleveland (90 minutes), the final ripples of the Appalachian hills provide a sweet haven for a weekend-long celebration of a slew of genuine music: the best in rock, newgrass, alt-country, bluegrass, singer-songwriters and much more. Festival campers will love setting up their camper in the RV section with electric and water hook ups provided, plus a variety of VIP camping options, including a premium ‘Glamping’ offering that features completely set up tents, cots, camping chairs, lanterns, drink tickets, t-shirts, and access to the Smoky Run lodge, are all available within the various package pricing. Early Bird tickets start at $99 for the entire weekend. Complete festival information and directions are available at www.SmokyRunFestival.com. Tickets go on sale to the public Friday, December 14 at 10 AM ET via the Smoky Run Festival website.For more information, head to the official website for the Smoky Run Music Festival here.last_img read more

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Our signature 1776 revolutionary

first_imgJohn Hancock was an aristocratic Boston merchant, Harvard College graduate (Class of 1754), Revolutionary War hero, and the first patriot to sign the Declaration of Independence.It is not Hancock’s patriotism, of course, that chiefly survives in the popular imagination 220 years after his death. It is his dramatic autograph — floridly large, and (in case we missed seeing it) underlined. The first synonym for “signature,” after all, is “John Hancock.” Harvard owns an early example, which anchors a signed 1754 letter to his sister Mary.But as the Fourth of July approaches, it is useful to remember that around the time of the Revolution, Hancock — sequestered in Philadelphia and Baltimore with the Continental Congress — was wary of more than attacks from the hovering British. He was wary of attacks, by letter, from officials at Harvard College. They wanted their money back.A letter from John Hancock to his sister, Mary, includes his dramatic signature. Written while he was a senior at Harvard, the letter includes an exhortation from Hancock to his sister to write to him more frequently: “I wish you would spend one hour writing to me. I do assure you I should take it as a great favor. There was … a report that you are going to be married soon. I should be glad to know to whom. I hope you will give me an Invitation.”Hancock was elected Harvard treasurer in July 1773, taking into his possession 15,400 pounds sterling in securities, along with the College account books. By November 1774, Harvard President Samuel Langdon and others wrote the first in a two-year series of dunning letters to Hancock, calling for an accounting and for him to return the materials. The fifth such letter arrived at Hancock’s Concord, Mass., home in April 1775, a week before the opening battles of the Revolutionary War in Lexington and Concord. His response — the original resides at Harvard’s Houghton Library — was so chilly that he cast it in the third person, offering that “he very seriously resents” the letter’s implications.On March 17, 1776, Langdon penned a more conciliatory letter, since by then he was fully aware of Hancock’s growing role in the unfolding Revolution.One example of that growing centrality: On July 6, 1776, Hancock sent a freshly printed copy of the Declaration of Independence to Gen. Artemas Ward, a member of Harvard’s Class of 1748, who commanded Continental Army troops in Boston. (Harvard owns the original letter.) Hancock sent a similar missive to Gen. George Washington in New York. It contained the same message: Make sure everyone under your command hears about this.Not long after, in November 1776, tutor Stephen Hall, an emissary from Harvard, confronted Hancock in Baltimore. (His expense report for the trip is in the Harvard University Archives.) Hall returned to Cambridge with the account books and other papers. By then, the Harvard-held bonds were worth 600 pounds more than they were when Hancock took possession of them, despite outlays for faculty pay.This alternate personal combat, carried out in the shadows of the war that made a nation, became a story that dogged the Hancock legend far after his death in 1793. The man with the big signature became the man who had absconded with Harvard’s money. Historians soon stepped in to squelch this canard, and now it’s an incident barely remembered.But in his own day, after the Revolutionary War, Hancock was still threatened with lawsuits from Harvard that claimed he still owed more than he had returned. But the claims were not public or credible enough that they affected Hancock’s blooming political career. (He became, for one, the first governor of the commonwealth of Massachusetts.) By the end of his first gubernatorial term, however, in 1785, Hancock did admit that he still owed Harvard a little over 1,000 pounds. But he was still stung enough by wartime accusations that he never paid up.His heirs did pay up, including interest, in 1793. But an echo of Harvard claims survived into the 1940s. The allegation: Hancock’s estate still owed $526 in compound interest.Back in 1773, before this 20-year row had erupted, it was easy to see why Hancock had been tapped as Harvard treasurer. For one, he was a celebrity among Boston merchants — a man who in 1764 had not only inherited an enormous fortune, but who was also known for tweaking royal colonial authorities by making money as a smuggler. In 1768, in an anti-tax prank that foreshadowed the American Revolution, Hancock smuggled a large cargo of madeira wine ashore from his aptly named company ship, Liberty. (You can’t make this stuff up.) The royal governor decided to make an example of Hancock’s defiance. He seized Liberty as its next cargo was being loaded, which set off a storm of anti-English protest. Overnight, Hancock became a sensation.In some ways, the handsome Harvard graduate was an unlikely champion of liberty. He was the scion of a loyalist family who had turned from being a mild Whig to being openly a rebel. He favored silk brocade jackets and silver buckles, but the sartorial Hancock also had a common touch. He visited coffeehouses frequented by laborers and gave away free firewood to the poor.Hancock’s story illuminates the real-life arguments that continued in parallel to the great events of the 1770s. (Not all great men of that era, his story seems to say, were busy with just great things.) It also allows for a glimpse at the Harvard College of Hancock’s youth.The future Founding Father was 13 years old in July 1750 when he appeared at Harvard for his entrance examinations. They were oral exams, except for one required essay to be written in Latin. Hancock, taught at home for a longer time than most of his peers, had by then only been in school for five years. He passed and went on to enjoy the festivities. In those days, Commencement was also in July because the term referred to both seniors commencing life and to “sub-freshmen” like Hancock commencing their college careers.As a freshman, Hancock sprang to the top of the list in class ranking, which was then determined by social status, not grades. It put him first in line at breakfast (coffee, chocolate, biscuits, and beer) and at the main meal of the day, at noon: one pound of meat and vegetables for each undergraduate, washed down with cider drunk from common vessels. (They were washed once a week. Plates were washed every few months.)The future great man studied Greek, Latin, rhetoric, the Calvinist catechism, metaphysics, and all the other required courses. But he also likely indulged in the pastimes of those notoriously riotous days. The evening meal — usually a meat pie — was washed down with beer, a repast that more often led to more beer instead of more books. For extra fun, undergraduates in Hancock’s day would invite Titus — a local slave and Cambridge character — to their drinking parties. He would get drunk too. One historian estimated that Hancock’s late-18th-century Harvard was marked by greater per capita alcohol consumption than even the bathtub-gin era of the 1920s.The same era at Harvard produced other Founding Fathers. They included Samuel Adams, John Adams, Elbridge Gerry (the fifth U.S. vice president, who lent his name to the practice of gerrymandering), and patriot and pamphleteer James Otis Jr. By chance, all of these Founding Fathers lived in Massachusetts Hall.A portion of an engraving of John Hancock, first published in England in 1775. Source: Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of AmericaOther men in that august category had connections to Harvard.Benjamin Franklin received an honorary A.M. degree in 1753, the first awarded to a nongraduate. George Washington received an honorary LL.D. in 1776, shortly after the fledgling Continental Army had harried the British army out of Boston. The degree, in Latin and translated in local newspapers, was signed by every member of the Harvard Corporation except Hancock, who was bottled up in war-threatened Philadelphia. It was Washington’s first academic degree. In 1787, Thomas Jefferson received an honorary LL.D.In 1792, the year before his death, Hancock himself received the same honorary doctor of laws degree from Harvard — a sign that his troubles with Harvard had not gone very deep. Another sign came in October 1793, at Hancock’s mile-long funeral procession in Boston. Close to the front of the line were Harvard’s highest officials.last_img read more

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4-H Vet Lab Day

first_imgThirty-six 4-H members from 14 Georgia counties visited the University of Georgia Tifton campus Thursday, March 15, for 4-H Veterinary Science Career Exploration Day.UGA Cooperative Extension’s Southwest District 4-H Youth Development program and the UGA College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) partnered to present the event.Middle and high school students toured the UGA-Tifton Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory and learned about various topics related to veterinary medicine, including how to examine viruses and, using a calving simulator, how to properly deliver a calf.Melinda Miller, the Southwest District 4-H program development coordinator, planned the event with district UGA Extension agents and program assistants who have active 4-H animal programs. The agents and staff recruited students interested in pursuing careers in veterinary medicine or animal sciences.“We, as 4-H Youth Development professionals, always innovate to build career exploration into our programs,” Miller said. “Providing our students with hands-on experiences like this helps youth make better decisions when considering college and career choices. There is a great need for food animal veterinarians in our state. The opportunities for careers in agriculture are virtually limitless.”Daniel Peterson, a 4-H member from Lowndes County, was among the students at the event. Though Peterson hadn’t thought of veterinary medicine as a career option prior to his visit to the UGA-Tifton veterinary diagnostic laboratory, he found the experience eye-opening.“It was very interesting. We learned a lot about viruses and how they do autopsies, how they test the blood. It was really cool,” Peterson said.Kayla Stephens, a Crisp County 4-H member who works at a veterinary clinic as part of her school’s work-based learning program, also attended the event.“Coming here today really showed me that this is what I want to do, and I’m going to go for this dream,” she said. “This day really reinforced what goes into becoming a veterinarian and what comes through the diagnostic lab. It was really great and opened my eyes.”Veterinarian Dr. Lee Jones, associate professor in the veterinary college’s Food Animal Health and Management Program at UGA-Tifton, and the staff of the veterinary diagnostic laboratory provided instructional labs for the students in virology, bacteria, pathology, DNA, blood and fecal matter, and zoonotic diseases.Additionally, 4-H members heard presentations from Dr. Janemarie Hennebell, veterinarian with the Georgia Department of Agriculture; Dr. Wendy Cuevas, veterinarian with the Georgia Veterinary Medical Association; Dr. Scott Brown, UGA veterinary college associate dean of academic affairs; Breanna Coursey, director of student and employer engagement for the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; and the veterinary college.For more information about the Georgia 4-H program, visit www.Georgia4H.org.last_img read more

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Long Island Welcomes Medical Marijuana Dispensaries In Riverhead & Lake Success

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [dropcap]A[/dropcap]s Dana and Paul Dargan approached the nondescript building housing one of two Long Island medical marijuana dispensaries that opened on Friday, Dana glanced around in both directions and wondered where the protesters were.The Dargans made the short trip from Hampton Bays to Riverhead, curious to check out the Columbia Care facility and pledge their support. On this dreary morning, there were no signs of opponents. The only people mingling in the parking lot were journalists documenting the historic grand opening and patients making their way inside a neighboring doctor’s office. The dispensary wouldn’t be open for business until 1 p.m.Anyone looking for marijuana leaf displays indicating the dispensary’s location wouldn’t find that, either. Unlike the ubiquitous green leaves blaring from outside facilities in California and other states beckoning potential customers inside and inviting awkward queries from tourists, the Colombia Care building possesses an unassuming tan façade and eschews eye-popping pot paraphernalia.The excitement was palpable once people made their way inside, however. The occasion drew Riverhead Town officials welcoming Columbia Care to Suffolk County, medical marijuana activists and residents like the Dargans.“I believe in compassionate care,” Dana, 62, told the Press, as she waited for the facility’s official ribbon-cutting ceremony. “And this is what it’s all about to me.”The waiting room inside Columbia Care’s Medical Marijuana dispensary in Riverhead. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)Friday marked the beginning of what many supporters see as the future of healthcare for patients with debilitating diseases who can’t seem to find the comfort they desire. The law covers only a small list of serious conditions, including cancer, Lou Gehrig’s Disease, HIV/Aids, and epilepsy. [FULL LIST BELOW]Eighteen months since the New York State Legislature approved the Compassionate Care Act, Long Island finally opened the doors to its own dispensaries.“We think this is a wonderful opportunity for patients and physicians to really examine and take advantage of a new form of healthcare,” Columbia Care CEO Nicholas Vita told the Press inside the facility Friday morning. Vita offered reporters a tour of the building, though it was a quick one. Patients only have access to a brightly lit waiting room festooned with an oversized photo of a marijuana leaf and a message declaring the facility’s “promise” to patients, and a pharmacy where transactions and consultations occur.For now, patients can only enter the building by ringing a door bell and displaying a state-issued medical marijuana identification, which is then validated by a member of the staff who swipes the card electronically.New Yorkers interested in signing up for the program must receive a prescription from a certified physician and then register with the New York State Department of Health. As of Friday, there were 306 physicians and 465 patients certified by the state, the DOH said.Columbia Care said it was expecting about 15 patients Friday who had signed up for appointments. Over time, the office expects to have normal business hours where patients can walk in without scheduling in advance, Vita said.The medicinal marijuana offered at the Riverhead facility costs between $100-$300, Vita explained. But, he noted, some patients may be entitled to subsidies of 15-20 percent depending on if they live below the poverty line or are on Medicaid.“The goal for us is to make sure no one ever comes and leaves empty handed,” Vita said, inside the pharmacy.“If they want medicine, they should be able to get medicine, and that’s something we have the ability to do.”The law prohibits smokable marijuana. Columbia Care currently offers medicinal cannabis in liquid form, but Vita said he expects to have the drug available as a vapor and pill form in the near future. Columbia Care has three other facilities in the state, including Rochester, Plattsburgh, and New York City.When a patient enters the pharmacy they’ll be able to meet with a pharmacist technician for a consolation. Depending on the severity of their condition, the pharmacist can adjust the prescription, Vita said. Since the process is new for everyone, Vita hopes patients take advantage of the time they can spend with staff instead of walking over to the counter and immediately purchasing the medicine and walking out.“We want to create options,” he said.The program’s rollout did not come without criticism.Count Dana Dargan among the list of people unhappy that the law only includes 10 qualified conditions. She listed her husband Paul’s long litany of medical issues and lamented that although he suffers from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) from serving in the Vietnam War, he won’t be eligible.“My husband is a Vietnam vet and he’s got a third of a heart, defibrillator, pace maker, five bypasses, nine stints,” she said, rattling off a lengthy list of maladies, which includes a bout with cancer, which he won. “He’s had a lot of health problems.”“I think from the PTSD from Vietnam that he still suffers from—from back when he was 19 in 1968—I think all veterans should be entitled to it who have PTSD,” she said.Donna Schwier of Compassionate Care NY, an advocacy group, said she will continue push lawmakers to change the law so it includes additional conditions, such as PTSD.Still, she firmly believes the list of qualified conditions will only grow as time goes on.“We don’t expect things to happen overnight, at least I don’t,” she said. “But I am optimistic of things going the right way.”For now, though, Schwier is ecstatic for patients with life-altering conditions who are now eligible for treatment.Schwier will also take advantage of the program to help relieve the pain caused by Fibromyalgia, a muscle disorder.“It’s really going to make a difference in those peoples’ lives,” she told the Press. “You’ve got the people with cancer who have no appetite, they’re suffering severe nausea from the side effects of chemotherapy…you’ve got people with Multiple Sclerosis with severe painful spasticity, and the list goes on.”Vita of Columbia Care sees benefits in how New York has adopted the program.“I like the way New York has done this, and the reason why is because patients and physicians will know what the dosing is, they’ll know all of those things they don’t necessarily know in other markets, and if this is supposed to be medicine, those things have to be in place for people to really embrace it,” he said.“Over time I’m sure the program will expand,” Vita continued. “But what we really want to see is sustainable, long-term partnership with the medical community, that’s driven by the physicians and by science.”Eligible Nassau County residents won’t have to travel to Riverhead to seek treatment. Bloomfield Industries also opened its doors to patients on Friday in Lake Success.“Patients suffering from painful and debilitating conditions no longer have to wait for the treatment they so desperately need,” Colette Bellefleur, Bloomfield Industries’ chief operating officer, said in a statement. “Bloomfield is deeply committed to alleviating suffering with safe, cannabis-based medicine distributed in a secure and compassionate environment. We look forward to serving patients in Nassau County and earning a place as a trusted healthcare leader in the community.”For those who can’t find a physician certified by the state, Vita said the company maintains a list of approved-doctors it can share with prospective patients.LIST OF QUALIFIED CONDITIONSCancer, HIV infection or AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury with spasticity, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, neuropathy, and Huntington’s disease.last_img read more

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Digital-first branding effort supports long-term growth

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Credit union’s market share has hovered around 7% for 30 years, and big banks are outspending credit unions on marketing by a 43-1 margin.What’s the answer to big banks’ competitive advantage?One piece lies in the digital-first, category-level branding effort that supports long-term credit union growth: The Open Your Eyes to a Credit Union® Initiative.The initiative is designed to change perceptions that block consumers’ consideration of credit unions for financial services, says Susan Toalson, CUNA’s vice president, creating awareness. It is different than direct response marketing and is meant to strengthen consumer perceptions as they see more content over time. continue reading »last_img read more

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Nicolas Pepe details changes made by Freddie Ljungberg at Arsenal since Unai Emery sacking

first_imgNicolas Pepe details changes made by Freddie Ljungberg at Arsenal since Unai Emery sacking Pepe is Arsenal’s record signing (Picture: Getty)Nicolas Pepe has revealed Freddie Ljungberg has made changes to training and tactics since the exit of Unai Emery.Arsenal parted ways with Emery last month amid rumours the head coach had lost the trust of his players, who were confused by his tactical demands.Ljungberg’s appointment is yet to yield any significant upturn in results, but Arsenal’s record signing insisted changes have been made.‘There have been some changes schedule-wise in terms of the training, Ljungberg has his own way of dictating training,’ he said.ADVERTISEMENT Comment Advertisement Ljungberg is struggling to improve results (Picture: EPA)‘Obviously he has already shared his vision.‘There have been a few tactical changes, but it takes time for everything to settle.’AdvertisementAdvertisementA 2-1 defeat to Brighton last week piled more misery on Arsenal, with the Gunners just four points above the relegation zone in the Premier League.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityArsenal’s top four hopes appear to be dead following a dismal spell of results and Pepe addressed his side’s recent woes on the pitch.‘Obviously it is a frustrating situation for us, but it is nothing new [for me],’ said Pepe.‘When I was at Lille we had a bit of the same, we went ten, eleven games without a win and obviously this adds to the pressure.‘We know that our fans have a lot of expectations from us.’MORE: Laurent Koscielny calls for unity at Arsenal amid crisiscenter_img Ljungberg tries to explain Arsenal’s 1-2 loss at home against BrightonTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 4:02FullscreenLjungberg tries to explain Arsenal’s 1-2 loss at home against Brightonhttps://metro.co.uk/video/ljungberg-tries-explain-arsenals-1-2-loss-home-against-brighton-2064336/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.MORE: Arsenal boss Freddie Ljungberg not giving up on Champions League spot Coral BarryMonday 9 Dec 2019 2:52 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Advertisementlast_img read more

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Tax changes hit investor numbers

first_imgAgents have seen a drop in investor interest after last July’s changes to tax laws.CHANGES which came into effect a year ago surrounding what property investors can claim at tax time are starting to affect the Cairns property market.In May last year the federal government proposed changes to the depreciation of plant and equipment assets and the claiming of travel expenses relating to inspecting, maintaining, or collecting rent for a residential rental property in the federal budget.The travel expenditure is also not recognised in the cost base of the property for capital gains tax purposes.The changes to depreciation mean it is not allowed on floor coverings, airconditioning and appliances within the property at the time of purchase. Big property changes starting July 1 Full size treehouse for $600K Inside absurd $250 million mansion The investor tax crackdown has seen less interstate buyers visiting Cairns, according to Mr Moller.Any investor who purchases a new property can continue to claim depreciation for plant and equipment as usual. Those changes were passed by the senate in November and became law on July 1.More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms3 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns3 days agoAfter a positive start to the year, LJ Hooker Edge Hill principal Ross Moller said investment property sales had tapered off in Cairns. He blamed the more restrictive tax conditions around owning an investment property.“The crackdown on investors means Cairns is less attractive to interstate buyers,” he said.“The incentive to visit Cairns and claim a tax deduction is gone now so I am seeing less interstate customers coming up to look at properties while they’re on holiday. There is no short-term gain to owning an investment property now unless there is capital growth.” LJ Hooker Cairns Edge Hill principal Ross Moller at a property he was selling in Mooroobool.“There are of course long-term gains such as rental returns and potential capital gains. “But, unless you’re a renovator who just gets in and gets out, there’s not much of a drawcard.”The new laws only apply to second-hand residential rental properties bought after May 9, 2017. But Mr Moller said owning property was one of the best ways to build wealth.After buying an investment property, a specialist quantity surveyor will ensure all deductions are identified and claimed correctly under the new legislation. SEE MORE CAIRNS REAL ESTATE NEWS HERElast_img read more

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Auctions will be Cairns’ biggest selling method in future

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality LevelsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND Session ID: 2020-09-28:4789480a383ed30f55930b54 Player Element ID: vjs_video_736 OK Close Modal DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen00:00WANT to sell your home quickly and for the best possible price?Consider taking it to auction.One of the city’s leading real estate agents has said Cairns will one day reach the crazy heights of auctions in Sydney and Melbourne, where the majority of homes are sold that way.“The homes we put up for auction definitely sell faster than doing it the old-fashioned way,” RE/MAX principal Tony Williamson said.“And if you list it and it sells the next day, some people might think that’s a great result but it might not be what the market would pay.”Last week eight properties went to auction at the Whitfield chapel, owned by RE/MAX.One sold prior to the auction, two sold that night and two more sold the next day.Mr Williamson said the remaining four properties would sell this week. More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms2 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns2 days ago“No one can question an auction, the agent has demonstrated over four weeks what will be the best a market will pay. The auction is the purest form of real estate, that why deceased estates and mortgagee-in-possession sales are done by auctions,” he said.“It takes the pressure off the sellers too. If it doesn’t go to auction you have to come up with a price, and that is subjected to offers.“With an auction there is no pricepoint, but they do set the reserve on the day of the auction.”He believes Cairns will get to the stage where the majority of sales are via auction.last_img read more

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Al Jazeera journalists jailed for 3 years in Egypt

first_imgJudge Hassan Farid said the court investigated the case fully and established that Peter Greste, Mohammed Fahmy and Baher Mohammed broadcast false news, were not journalists, and operated without permits or licences.Australian citizen Greste was sentenced to a three-year prison sentence in absentia as President Abdel-Fattah al-Sissi ordered him to be deported in January.Three Egyptian students on trial alongside the journalists were also jailed for three years. Last year, the six men were sentenced to seven years in prison each on charges of collaborating with the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood movement and spreading false news about Egypt.The initial verdict was overturned on appeal in January and Farid later released the defendants on bail. An Egyptian court on Saturday jailed three Al Jazeera journalists for three years each on charges of broadcasting false news and working without permits, in the retrial of a case that has highlighted the country’s crackdown on the media.last_img read more

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