Category: moyvqktq

RSF condemns Facebook’s blocking of journalistic content in Australia

first_img Organisation To implement these restrictions, Facebook is using machine-learning tools to identify news content publishers but this has had the collateral effect of blocking other kinds of content, including the pages of several NGOs such as RSF, public health bodies, governmental institutions and even entities that handle emergencies. Mongolia : RSF urges presidential candidates to voice support for press freedom Facebook carried out its threat. In response to the Australian government’s plan to make platforms pay media outlets, Facebook has blocked the sharing of journalistic content in Australia. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns this decision, which impacts the reliability and pluralism of the information available on this social media platform. RSF_en News News China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists Receive email alerts Facebook’s response, called the “nuclear option” by The Australian daily newspaper, is radical. Australian media can no longer share or post content on their Facebook pages, while users in Australia can no longer see or share links to news on the platform, whether Australian or international news. Facebook has not as yet responded to RSF’s questions. News “No posts yet” is the message that the Facebook pages of the Australian media have been showing since 17 February. This blackout is deliberate. Facebook announced on 17 February that it would “restrict publishers and people in Australia from sharing or viewing Australian and international news content.”center_img Follow the news on Asia – Pacific Help by sharing this information AustraliaUnited StatesAsia – PacificAmericas Online freedoms InternetFreedom of expression to go further June 7, 2021 Find out more “Facebook is abusing its dominant position to defend its economic interests at the expense of online news reliability and pluralism,” said Iris de Villars, the head of RSF’s Tech Desk. “Regardless of the proposed law being discussed, these restrictions affect the ability of Australian citizens to access reliable and independent information on this platform. We urge Facebook to reverse this decision, which totally contradicts its pledges to combat disinformation.” The decision was taken in reaction to the Australian government’s proposed “News Media Bargaining Code,” under which platforms such as Facebook and Google would have to pay Australian media outlets for the content they display. News June 2, 2021 Find out more AustraliaUnited StatesAsia – PacificAmericas Online freedoms InternetFreedom of expression February 22, 2021 RSF condemns Facebook’s blocking of journalistic content in Australia June 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Art Center College of Design Receives $2 Million Gift to Establish Hoffmitz Milken Center for Typography

first_img Letterform expert and Professor Leah Toby Hoffmitz Milken works with a student at Art Center College of Design where she taught for more than 20 years. © Copyright Steven A. Heller and Art Center College of DesignArt Center College of Design Professor Leah Toby Hoffmitz Milken with faculty colleagues Ramone Munoz (left) and Stan Kong (right). Photo courtesy Art Center College of DesignToday Art Center College of Design announced a $2 million gift to the College from the Lowell Milken Family Foundation in honor of legendary Professor Leah Toby Hoffmitz Milken who passed away on October 25 after an extended illness. The commitment will establish the Hoffmitz Milken Center for Typography to advance the research, teaching and understanding of letterform design and typography. Recognizing typography as a vital component of our visual culture, the College has been developing plans to make Art Center a central influential force in this field. The Foundation’s gift helped turn those plans into reality.“Leah’s expertise in typography and her gifts as a teacher will be deeply missed by our community,” said Lorne M. Buchman, president of Art Center College of Design. “We have both the desire and responsibility to build on her legacy in a meaningful way through the Hoffmitz Milken Center and its programming—the focus of which is unique in higher education,” he said. “We are most grateful to the Foundation for providing this tremendous opportunity to accomplish this long-envisioned goal.“During the past decade, advances in technology and media have ushered in a new era of visual learning,” continued Buchman. “We continually consume information visually, and letterforms are a central and critical element of that visual world. It is imperative that we understand typography and its meaning as we navigate the global information age.”The Center for Typography aligns with the College’s long-term strategy of convening new dialogues among a diverse community to shape and define culture, encourage relevance and social responsibility in art and design discourse and practice, and prepare graduates for leadership, research and creating at the highest level.“Establishing the Center is the best way to honor Leah’s memory as well as her extraordinary knowledge about typography, her deep passion and dedication to her students, and her commitment to give back to a field which she thoroughly cherished,” said philanthropist Lowell Milken, Leah’s husband and chairman of the Lowell Milken Family Foundation. “She was so pleased to know this was underway when discussions about the gift began some time ago.”Renowned as a letterform expert, Leah taught at the College for more than 20 years and was a beloved member of the community. Throughout her career, she specialized in the creation of unique logotypes and typefaces for multiple industries and media. Corporate brands benefiting from her expert typographic eye include FedEx, Nokia, United Airlines and Disney.Since joining the faculty in 1992, Leah influenced a generation of graduates, many of whom have become internationally recognized experts in graphic design and typography. Notable former students include Mike Abbink, senior creative director at the Museum of Modern Art, and designer of the typefaces Kievet and Brando; Bryce Shawcross, graphic designer at Tesla Motors; Hansen Smith, art director at Magento, owned by eBay Inc.; and Josh Finklea, designer of the typeface Post Grotesque.Leah’s profound dedication to teaching and her desire to give back to students was recognized in 2008 when she was presented with an Honorary Alumna designation from Art Center. She was also active in the College’s Legacy Circle, an alumni-led volunteer group raising support for student scholarships.In 2013, Leah received the College’s Distinguished Achievement Award in recognition of excellence in teaching, professional accomplishment and institutional service. Tributes at the ceremony hailed her extraordinary devotion to her students, whom she challenged and shaped, even as she respected their process of discovery. Her legendary high standards will be a focal point for the new Center.New Center to reinforce the value of letterform knowledge in contemporary visual culture“This gift provides a distinct opportunity for the College to create a new model of typographic education, research and international discourse that will serve as a professional destination and global resource for creative and commercial development in the field,” said Nikolaus Hafermaas, chair of Art Center’s Graphic Design department. “While drawing from the rich history of typographic development, the Center’s activities will lead the charge in exploring the future of typography in print, digital, emerging media and the growing field of Transmedia Design.”Interdisciplinary programming at the Hoffmitz Milken Center for Typography will consist of classes, exhibitions, visiting lecturers and symposia. It will also significantly enhance and complement existing campus resources serving students and the international professional community, including the College’s Archetype Press letterpress printing facility and transdisciplinary study abroad partnerships. Additionally, the Center will support strategic alliances with other educational and professional organizations.A portion of the gift will be allocated to student scholarships and faculty development. Since 2007, the Lowell Milken Family Foundation has supported students enrolled in the College’s undergraduate, graduate and public programs.The gift will also help fund a South Campus renovation project to create a physical space for the Center as well as support public and professional educational programs related to the past, present and future of typography.About the Lowell Milken Family FoundationFounded in 1986 and located in Santa Monica, the Lowell Milken Family Foundation (lowellmilken.org) is based on a core belief that human capital remains the world’s most important asset and the decisive element in every endeavor. Education endures as the best means for cultivating human capital by developing the skills, knowledge and experiences to prepare people for rewarding and productive lives. Yet education can only have this power if delivered and received as part of a rigorous experience. LMFF’s efforts are focused on groundbreaking, comprehensive initiatives that provide powerful opportunities for students, faculty and the community-at-large, such as the National Institute for Excellence in Teaching, the Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy at the UCLA School of Law, and the new Hoffmitz Milken Center for Typography at Art Center College of Design.About Art Center College of DesignFounded in 1930 and located in Pasadena, California, Art Center College of Design (artcenter.edu) is a global leader in art and design education. Art Center offers 11 undergraduate and seven graduate degrees in a wide variety of visual and applied arts as well as industrial design disciplines. In addition to its top-ranked academic programs, the College also serves members of the Greater Los Angeles region through a highly regarded series of year-round educational programs for all ages and levels of experience. Renowned for both its ties to industry and social impact initiatives, Art Center is the first design school to receive the United Nations’ Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) status. Throughout the College’s long and storied history, Art Center alumni have had a profound impact on popular culture, the way we live and important issues in our society. Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week More Cool Stuff Education Art Center College of Design Receives $2 Million Gift to Establish Hoffmitz Milken Center for Typography Long-envisioned Center Honors Faculty Member Leah Toby Hoffmitz Milken, Aims to Elevate Typographic Education, Expand Research and Teaching, and Serve as a Global Resource By TERI BOND, Media Relations Director Art Center College of Design Published on Tuesday, December 2, 2014 | 12:28 pm Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News center_img Community News 10 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Subscribe Business News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News Herbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Dos And Don’ts Of Tinder You Must KnowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Signs You’re Not Ready To Be In A RelationshipHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautylast_img read more

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New Series Explores Mindful Living in Action and Transforming Distress into Compassion

first_img Business News Subscribe Make a comment Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS HerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeauty STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Tzu Chi Center’s C.A.F.E. 229 has launched its premiere season of presentations which explore how to transform distress into compassion and on mindful living in action. In this second installment, guest speaker Roshi Pat Enkyo O’Hara discusses how “Meditation Makes a Bodhisattva.”In this presentation, she will cover coping with stress in the era of COVID-19, the meaning and purpose of a Bodhisattva, the ideal qualities a Bodhisattva should display in the service of others, and a simple, guided meditation.The presentation will be available for watching after 4 p.m. on Friday, August 21. For more, click here.Roshi Pat Enkyo O’Hara currently serves as Abbot of the Village Zendo. She received priest ordination from Maezumi Roshi and Dharma Transmission and Inka from Bernie Tetsugen Glassman. Roshi Enkyo’s lineage comes through Maezumi Roshi, whose teaching was uncommon, bringing together Soto priest training and study of the Rinzai koan system. Moreover, Roshi Glassman’s focus on social engagement and peacemaking underlies much of her vision of Zen practice.Roshi is a Founding Teacher of the Zen Peacemaker Family, a spiritual and social action association. Roshi’s focus is on the expression of Zen through caring, service, and creative response. Her Five Expressions of Zen form the matrix of study at the Village Zendo: Meditation, Study, Communication, Action, and Caring.Learn more about Village Zendo at https://villagezendo.org.Learn more about C.A.F.E. 229 and the Tzu Chi Center at https://tzuchicenter.org. 85 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday center_img Faith New Series Explores Mindful Living in Action and Transforming Distress into Compassion Roshi Pat Enkyo O’Hara discusses how “Meditation Makes a Bodhisattva” STAFF REPORT Published on Thursday, August 20, 2020 | 12:17 pm Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Top of the News Community News STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes More Cool Stuff Community Newslast_img read more

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The best of British

first_img Comments are closed. TheUK is poor at blowing its own trumpet. Patrick McCurry sets the record straightby asking readers to nominate the best home-grown training concepts of all timeWethink of the US as the launch pad of new people development ideas, yet many ofthe staples of the modern approaches to training come from UK shores. Forexample, British comedian John Cleese was probably the first to imagine thatinstructional films could be humorous when he co-founded Video Arts back in1972, and nearly 60 countries watch those films now. And as executive chairmanof KnowledgePool David Wimpress points out, his company claims to be the firstto create an e-learning service over the Internet, in 1995. Self-managedlearning, which gathered a group of individuals together to work on their ownlearning projects, is believed to have come from Roffey Park. So to celebratethe fact that this edition of Training is circulated around the globe, wecanvassed opinion on the best of British training ideas of recent decades.JennyDaisleyChief executive, Springboard ConsultancyIwould argue that a personal development approach to training, while not necessarilyinvented in the UK, is an area in which a number of British training companiesenjoy an international reputation.Aholistic approach to development, which does not just focus on someone’s job,is becoming increasingly popular, and the UK is at the forefront in this trend.PaulKearnsSenior partner, Personnel WorksIwould put forward the Management Charter Initiative (MCI), which was launchedin the 1980s, as one of Britain’s best training ideas. Although the MCI did nottake off in a major way, the thinking behind it was sound.Itgrew out of the whole move in Britain away from an apprentice-based “timeserved” approach to one that asked whether people could actually do the jobsthey were supposed to do.Thattrend of looking for evidence of people’s skills spilled into managementdevelopment and was embodied in the MCI. It represented a departure from abroad-brush approach to training to one that questioned managers’ particularskills.MikeCannellAdviser (training and development), CIPDBritainwas a pioneer of outdoor development, in which individuals are taken from theirnormal surroundings and given tasks to complete in a challenging, environment.The exercises really stretch people and because team members are dressed forthe outdoors, with no suits and ties, it helps reduce barriers betweencolleagues and is good for team building. The concept has spread to the US andhas now been taken up in continental Europe.JulieSykesAssessment centre co-ordinator, Shepherd Corporate ServicesIwould nominate NVQs as one of Britain’s positive contributions to training.While the NVQ system has come in for a fair amount of criticism, if they areimplemented effectively, they provide a flexible and powerful work-basedtraining plan.Theirgreat benefit is that they recognise an individual’s experience and requireevidence of how actual skills and knowledge are applied in the workplace.Herein the construction industry, NVQs have become a growing standard for measuringskills. For example, the Chartered Institute of Building now recognises formembership those who achieve NVQ Level 5 in construction contracts management.MarcAucklandChief knowledge manager, BTAction-centredlearning, as many people know, was invented in the UK and is one of our biggestcontributions to training. I’ve always found it a very effective way oftraining and developing people, as well as team building.AtBT we have used several British training companies specialising in the area,and a number of our overseas joint venture partners have sent their people oncourses in the UK.Theexperiential learning benefits of action-centred learning are very powerful inteambuilding, problem-solving and development.TonyLongmireTechnical and training director, LGH GroupBritainused to provide excellent “hands-on” training that was the envy of the worldbut has sadly been lost, as those with the experience and expertise haveretired. What has replaced it does not cover the more traditional skills thatwere commonplace, particularly within the engineering and constructionindustries.Britainis good at problem-solving and innovative training techniques at local level,but the enthusiasm wanes when obstacles are created by well-intentionedgovernment bodies in charge of training and funding. Previous Article Next Article The best of BritishOn 1 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Ditch the targets and invest in leadership training plans

first_img Previous Article Next Article With the UK’s managers under relentless attack for their ineffectualperformance perhaps its time to recognise that best practice and innovation arenot intuitive and that training can make a difference”Management training in Britain is too little, too late, for toofew,” claimed prolific management guru Charles Handy. But the interestingbit is not that he said it, but when he said it – 1987. Has anything reallychanged since then? Sometimes to accept an unpalatable truth we have to hear it from anoutsider. I suspect Trade and Industry Secretary Patricia Hewitt knows this andthat it is one of the key reasons she hired Professor Michael Porter – one ofthe world’s leading business strategists – to tell the DTI why we lag behind onproductivity. British managers have been under attack in the media as ineffectual andamateurish. We have been told by both Newsnight and Hewitt that the managementstyle of TV’s bumbling David Brent is sadly close to the truth. So, as Porterdelivered his initial findings, the collective sigh of relief was almostpalpable when he appeared to stop short of delivering a harsh verdict onBritish management. Instead, Porter highlighted the need for more unique strategies and ways ofcompeting, and called for greater innovation. However, in deriving his data oninnovation almost entirely from the UK’s contribution to US patentregistrations, he may have missed a trick or two. Business innovation in the UK over the past three to four years has involvedmore than the meagre levels of research and development to which he alluded,and the failure to invest in creating ‘unique value’ for British products andservices, with continuous cost-cutting setting the economy on a path ofdiminishing returns. Innovation is also to be found in the changing styles of business andorganisational leadership that are difficult to reflect in the largelyquantitative data he referenced. Last year’s Council for Excellence inManagement and Leadership report to the DTI clearly identified a lack ofstrategic thinking, communication, leadership, and motivational skills as keyfactors in the under-performance of British managers. Thankfully, many organisations in this country have moved from transactionalto transformational forms of leadership, and from a top-heavy directional styleto more devolved forms of management. This is beginning to counter-balance thekind of static and introspective management Porter described. But it will take time for the results to filter through to the broadereconomy. HR professionals still have much to do – of the four million or somanagers in the UK, only 20 per cent have management qualifications and around20 per cent of small firms and 4 per cent of large organisations provide nomanagement training at all. Our own experience shows that succession planning is a major issue for manyorganisations, especially at board and senior manager level. Withoutinvestment, successors have a long lead-time before peak performance, which canhave an adverse impact on their organisation’s chances of reaching its truepotential. Non-investment here has a lasting and expensive impact. If the Government isreally prepared to ‘back off’ – in Professor Porter’s words – from economictarget-setting in favour of a more proactive and dynamic private sector, thenconsiderably more investment will be required in middle management andleadership development. The acquisition of technical skills and training is all very well, but iffew British managers are prepared or equipped to assume responsibility, anyinvestment in R&D and innovation will make very little difference. We should take Porter’s principles on ‘clustering’ and apply them at theorganisational as well as at the community level. Empowering individuals tolead and innovate, even at lower levels of an organisation, need not be arecipe for organisational chaos. Rather, it would allow best practice to move smoothly up and across anorganisation, as well as down. It would also mean senior management spending fewer hours issuing directivesthat get lost in the works, and provide a boost to productivity where it reallymatters.By Claire Spencer, Head of research, TSO Consulting Ditch the targets and invest in leadership training plansOn 11 Feb 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Cape May County Freeholder Director Asks Visitors to Stay Home for Next Two Weeks

first_imgCape May County Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton is urging visitors to stay home during the next two weeks amid the coronavirus threat. Many people have come down to use their second homes or to stay with family at the shore while schools are closed throughout most of the country.These visitors have put an additional strain on the local supermarkets and could eventually be a burden on the medical system in Cape May County if a significant outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19) takes place here, Thornton said.“We love all of our visitors from Pennsylvania, North Jersey, New York, and further away,” he said in a press release Tuesday. “But this is not the time to be visiting the shore as we try to focus resources needed during this pandemic to our residents.”There have been reports of limited supplies at certain supermarkets and other stores, which is an issue nationwide, but has been compounded locally by the number of visitors to Cape May County over the past weekend, Thornton said. Cape May County only has one hospital and Thornton wants to ensure medical resources aren’t overtaxed if potentially sick people visit the county cause a mass outbreak.Also, based on the governor’s orders, restaurants are doing takeout business only or have closed completely. Movie theaters and many other gathering locations are closed. “We are hoping that people act responsibly now so we can minimize the health impacts in as short of a period of time as possible,” Thornton said. “It would be best if people could stay in their full-time residence for now as we address this current outbreak.” Cape May County Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton is worried that visitors may overtax the county’s medical resources if there is a mass outbreak of coronavirus. (Photo courtesy of Cape May County)last_img read more

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Watch Chick Corea And Return To Forever Play Their “Romantic Warrior” Album Live In 1976

first_imgIn 1976, jazz fusion was flying high as one of the most exciting new genres to cross over into the mainstream. Combining the precision of progressive rock, the free, improvisational spirit of jazz, and a healthy dose of psychedelic rock, the genre blew up over the course of the 70s, with stars like Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Jaco Pastorius, and Pat Matheny crossing over from jazz into the new genre to gain a newfound success. Of course, Jazz fusion is synonymous with Chick Corea and Return To Forever, a band that would be on the Mount Rushmore of jazz fusion with groups like the Headhunters and Weather Report.Return To Forever went through several lineup changes after forming in 1972, before Corea struck gold in 1974, as he combined Lenny White‘s tight drumming, Stanley Clarke‘s virtuosic bass playing, and a young Al Di Meola‘s electrifying abilities on the guitar with his incredible synthesizer skills. The band only existed for a short two-year period before Corea replaced Di Meola and White with other musicians, and RTF would continue with varying lineups throughout the 70s and 80s, but the band’s best years came came during Di Meola and White’s era in the band. 1974’s Where Have I Known You Before contained awesome tracks like “Vulcan Worlds” and “Beyond the Seventh Galaxy”, 1975’s No Mystery had the funky “Dayride” and “Sofisifunk”.However, it was 1976’s Romantic Warrior that featured the band at its absolute best, with all six tracks logging in as classics. The album opened with the multi-section masterpiece of “Medievel Overture”, before moving into Lenny White’s masterpiece melodic masterpiece “Sorceress”. “Romantic Warrior” featured the band on acoustic instruments (as opposed to their electric counterparts), but still showcases the band’s precise and progressive arrangements. Stanley Clarke’s psychedelic freak out, “The Magician”, followed, before the eleven-minute masterpiece “Duel of the Jester and the Tyrant”, which closed out the album. It’s a remarkable record, which still remains one of the most well-received and important jazz records of the fusion era.With that in mind, take a look at the premier Return To Forever lineup performing Romantic Warrior live in its entirety. The band stopped by the BBC2 music show The Old Grey Whistle Test in 1976 during their tour in support of the album, and just before Corea would kick White and Di Meola out of the band. The performance is simply incredible, and will leave you in awe as you see the raw improvisational prowess of one of the best jazz bands of all time.Watch Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke, Lenny White, & Al Di Meola, aka Return To Forver, playing their classic album “Romantic Warrior”last_img read more

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A plea for mercy

first_imgIn her new book, “When Should Law Forgive?,” Martha Minow, the 300th Anniversary University Professor, explores the possibilities for the U.S. legal system to become less punitive and more merciful. The Gazette sat down with Minow, former dean of Harvard Law School, to talk about her book and why she thinks forgiveness could make the law more just.Q&AMartha MinowGAZETTE: How do you define forgiveness, and why it is important for the U.S. legal system to be more so?MINOW: I define forgiveness as letting go of justified grievance or resentment. Our country right now is presiding over the most incarcerating criminal justice processes in the history of the world. We have the most people incarcerated per capita. But my larger concern is that we have techniques for forgiveness built into the law, but we don’t use them consistently, and we don’t use them with any criteria of fairness.GAZETTE: In your book, you say that the U.S. criminal system is very punitive. When and why did it become so punitive? Did race play a factor in this evolution?MINOW: I have no doubt that race plays a very large factor in this development. My wonderful colleague, no longer with us, Bill Stuntz, wrote a crucial book on exactly how our criminal justice system became the way that it is. First of all, it’s not one system; it’s very decentralized, divided in localities, states, etc. But one of his points is that we typically elect the prosecutors in most places; and it’s easier to win an election saying that you will be punitive than saying that you won’t be, and to say you’ll put more people in prison, and you’ll have longer sentences. It’s also been the fact that we have a history of racial division and racial oppression in this country. You don’t have to agree with everything in Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow” to see the patterns of racial discrepancy in incarceration rates and sentences. There’s something pernicious in the continuing racial divide in our criminal justice system.GAZETTE: You argue that bankruptcy law is a technique for forgiveness built into the U.S. legal system, but you also say that the law tends to forgive corporations more than individuals. Why is that and how does it relate to the issue of fairness?MINOW: The U.S. Constitution has a provision that gives Congress the power to enact a national bankruptcy law, which was a priority for the founding fathers, particularly for Thomas Jefferson, who himself was in debt during much of his life. He understood the importance of having the chance to have a fresh start, and he developed a political theory about why one generation should not burden the next with its debts. Bankruptcy practices in the United States are associated with the tradition of innovation, entrepreneurship, and risk-taking. But bankruptcy law has been subject to all the political processes of all of our laws. In its current iteration, it is much more forgiving of corporate debt than it is of individual debt. It makes it possible for a for-profit school to go bankrupt, but students who took out loans to go to that school cannot expunge their debts to bankruptcy. And that reflects the political process, power imbalances, and unfairness. “It’s also been the fact that we have a history of racial division and racial oppression in this country. … There’s something pernicious in the continuing racial divide in our criminal justice system.” Youth justice study finds prison counterproductive MINOW: I’ve been teaching almost 40 years in law school, and I realized that law schools don’t usually teach about forgiveness. I would like there to be discussion and education in law schools and in society generally about forgiveness: When should we forgive? When should the legal system forgive and when should it not forgive? How do we cultivate forgiveness and when should we not cultivate it? I explore in the book particular devices of forgiveness, as well as the possibility of creating legal systems that allow people to forgive one another. The use of restorative justice in criminal justice to bring people together, offenders and people who’ve been victimized, and allow them to talk with each other is very promising.I hope an impact of the book is to encourage people to take seriously the possibility of the legal system encouraging and supporting future-oriented solutions rather than always looking at the past and always looking to blame. Justice itself is seeking a response to wrongs but can be judged by whether the responses are proportional or whether they serve human ends. We should remind ourselves that we’ve created criminal and bankruptcy law to serve goals in the same way that every religion, every society, every civilization has promoted the development of apology, forgiveness, compensation, and restitution. We should remember the purposes of strengthening human relationships and helping people overcome trauma and helping societies rebuild after terrible atrocities; and we should revise the legal system to make those goals better served. We need more forgiveness, but we need a jurisprudence for forgiveness.This interview has been condensed and edited for length and clarity. New report documents urgent need to replace youth prisons with rehabilitation-focused alternatives Related GAZETTE: Who should not be forgiven?MINOW: I above all believe that this is a subject that deserves much more attention. We’re living in a time of resentment, and this country and other countries could gain by exploring the power to forgive that every religion has cultivated. Legal systems going back to Hammurabi’s Code and the Jubilee in the Bible have recognized that there needs to be a reset, a start over. At a minimum, we need more conversation, but of course, that means discussion about what’s not forgivable. For example, we have a statute of limitations for most crimes. Murder is so serious that even if it’s 20, 30 years later, you can still be prosecuted. And I think that is appropriate.But there are some aspects of the legal system itself that are unforgivable. For example, the use of fines and fees laid on top of the punishment for poor people and the court systems that use them knowing full well that the individuals cannot pay them, which leads to incarceration despite the fact that the Supreme Court has said we should never have a debtors’ prison. That’s unforgivable. One of the important elements of thinking about forgiveness is that those who commit wrong should always be thinking about, “What can I do to make it better?” I think the legal system has to make the legal system better.GAZETTE: What impact would you like your book to have? Prison education at Harvardcenter_img GAZETTE: You also say that the U.S. legal system could learn to be more forgiving of minors involved in criminal activity based on how international law deals with child soldiers. How should forgiveness work in such cases and what effects it would have?MINOW: The situation of global and local conflicts that draw minors into violent disputes and wars that are really conducted by adults has generated important innovations in international law. The very first case pursued by the International Criminal Court against Thomas Lubanga charged him and convicted him of the crime of recruiting and coercing minors to participate in armed conflict. That made an innovative recognition that there’s blame to be had here, but it should be on the heads of the adults.The U.S. once upon a time had the innovative idea of separate courts for juveniles. Over time we’ve drifted so that we treat juveniles like adults if they commit serious crimes, and they can be locked up for life without parole. We could learn from the international context to see that there are adults who are responsible for setting up a world in which the young people are drawn into those conflicts. And it’s not to say that the juveniles have no responsibility, but that we can locate that responsibility in that larger context and provide opportunities that give those young people a chance for a fresh start, the same way we do in bankruptcy, where we give businesses the chance for a new start.GAZETTE: How do you envision a change in the legal system toward forgiveness? Are you asking for new laws or more forbearance in the administration of law?MINOW: I’m very encouraged myself by the recent election of progressive prosecutors who ran on the platform that they want to come up with ways to divert juveniles from the criminal system or to allocate the scarce resources of the prosecutor’s office to the most serious crimes rather than to low-level drug offenses. We have several now in cities across the country — in Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco. What I see is the system working in a good way, where voters are seeking a more forgiving legal system, and yes, one that uses forbearance, but also explicit guidelines about when to use the criminal system.The bankruptcy process should be revised so that it is less punitive for individuals. But both processes, the election of the prosecutors and the changes in the bankruptcy system, are political. There are other changes within the legal system that I would like to see, and that includes the development of clear guidelines and usable procedures, for example, for expunging a criminal record. We have that capability but in most places it’s very hard to do; it’s hard to understand and hard to navigate. The same thing happens with sealing a record for minors.Another topic I deal with in the book is pardons, which is the capacity that governors and the president of the United States have to pardon a crime. It would be a better world if we develop guidelines for the use of that power. There are other countries that don’t leave that power simply in the hands of one person. The pardon power is one in particular where there’s great risk of abuse, due to the access that those with more power or visibility have. “We should remember the purposes of strengthening human relationships and helping people overcome trauma and helping societies rebuild after terrible atrocities; and we should revise the legal system to make those goals better served.” The formerly incarcerated, activists, and academics convene to discuss University’s programs, ties For D.C. writer Clint Smith, a prison reading program confirms the power of fiction to drive ‘radical empathy’ Judging a book The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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NeNe Leakes Will Return to B’way as Chicago’s Mama Morton

first_img Related Shows Chicago from $49.50 View Comments The Real Housewives of Atlanta star NeNe Leakes will return to Broadway as the Countess of the Clink! She is set to begin performances as Matron “Mama” Morton in the Tony-winning revival of Chicago on November 23 and is scheduled to play a limited engagement at the Ambassador Theatre through December 20.NaTasha Yvette Williams continues as Mama through November 1. Chicago veteran Carol Woods will step into the role November 2 through November 22.Leakes is best known for her appearances on Bravo’s The Real Housewives of Atlanta; she made her Broadway and stage debut last year as Cinderella’s wicked stepmother Madame in Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella. Additional acting credits include Glee.Chicago also currently stars Rumer Willis as Roxie Hart (through November 1), Amra-Faye Wright as Velma Kelly, Jason Danieley as Billy Flynn, Raymond Bokhour as Amos Hart and R. Lowe as Mary Sunshine.last_img read more

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To pay or to be paid, that is the answer

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Using a debit card to pay a merchant, in a store or online, is standardized and intuitive. But getting paid is neither. Receiving and depositing a check, getting the money “Venmo’d” to you, by ACH (including direct deposits), and of course, cash, are all options. These options require the payee to wait – until they receive the check, wait until the ACH clears or wait until the Venmo payment can be pushed to a bank account. There is an alternative: debit push payments. The “rails” that debit transactions use to make a purchase from a merchant can be used in the reverse direction, that is, the same rails can be used to push a payment to the debit cardholder’s account, pretty much instantly. Visa calls the capability “Visa Direct” and Mastercard calls it “Mastercard Send”. Both work the same; to allow funds to be pushed by a financial institution or a business to a cardholder knowing only the debit card number; no more having to provide the credit union’s routing number and checking or saving account number.The many possibilities for using this service is what makes the potential so powerful:Imagine being in a fender bender, and having the insurance claim disbursement sent directly to your account within minutes.last_img read more

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