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A Decade Unlike Any Other

first_img  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago A Decade Unlike Any Other Previous: Foreclosure Trends by the Numbers Next: The Road Ahead for Legal League 100 Home / Daily Dose / A Decade Unlike Any Other Tagged with: default Mortgage Rates default Mortgage Rates 2018-07-12 David Wharton Subscribe in Daily Dose, Featured, Magazine, Market Studies, News, Print Features, Servicing Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily July 12, 2018 3,349 Views center_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Editor’s note: This story originally appeared in the July issue of DS News, out now.The lead-up to and result of the collapse of the housing industry in 2008 has been documented and discussed by industry pundits, politicians, regulators, and technologists for years now. Even Hollywood has chimed in with films like The Big Short. But as the industry now marks a full decade since the beginning of the Great Recession, what are some key takeaways and tangible, valuable lessons learned for lenders, borrowers, service providers, and others as we move forward?One significant effect of the recession is many of the mortgage professionals working in 2008 are simply no longer part of the industry today, which isn’t surprising considering the sheer volume of mortgage businesses that was forced to shut down. The scale of this industry attrition was perhaps most clearly illustrated through the now infamous “Implode-o-Meter,” which documented the closing of more than 380 mortgage lenders between 2006 and 2012 on ML-Implode.com. In many ways, the industry experienced a massive “brain drain” over the past 10 years that it has yet to fully overcome.To truly understand where the mortgage industry has been and where it’s headed, it’s important to understand what the environment was like before the collapse.The Rear ViewThe early 2000s was a time of consistently falling mortgage interest rates, which fueled a wave of refinance volume. Many homeowners became—in essence—serial refinancers, always chasing the lower rate. This led to increased levels of competition among lenders to secure these deals, and the introduction of new loan products like no-cost refinance loans. This, in turn, appealed to borrowers as a “free refinance” option, and cash-out refinances boomed also. Some thought of their homes as a limitless ATM.One problem that developed during this time was the way many lenders managed this huge volume and the existence of a “front door” and “back door” delivery channel, which were often at odds with each other. Amy Crews Cutts, now a Chief Economist at Equifax, worked in a similar capacity at Freddie Mac at the time and explained it this way: “A borrower might go directly to their existing lender for a no-cost refinance only to be told that the lender did not offer that product. The borrower would then approach a mortgage broker, who would put the deal together. At closing, the borrower would learn that very same lender who initially said the no-cost option was not available was funding the refinance deal through the broker, paying the broker a large fee.“Many lenders had both a ‘front door’ and a ‘backdoor,’ and they were competing against each other, which led to a race to the bottom that was ultimately unsustainable,” Cutts said.The mortgage insurers also felt pressure because many of the loans were nontraditional, and structured in a way that avoided mortgage insurance. So in response, where they had traditionally served as a voice of reason, they loosened their standards to remain relevant and benefit from the growth in the market. Wall Street compounded the problem by investing heavily in these loans, bundling them together as collateralized debt obligations, which were held off of banks’ balance sheets under new Generally Accepted Accounting Principles rules. This meant they, for the most part, didn’t have hold capital against these assets. This proved to be a fatal error as there was a tremendous incentive to overleverage. The result was that rather than building portfolios around the standard, 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages, investment banks essentially took high-risk mortgages and packaged them to look like high-yield-low-risk bonds that were in hindsight systemically toxic.In many ways, the canary in the coal mine was the abandonment of traditional underwriting processes used to evaluate borrowers for creditworthiness. Mortgage loan underwriting had traditionally relied on the three Cs: credit, collateral, and capacity. During the pre-crisis boom, it generally shifted to just one C: credit. Collateral in the form of down payments was no longer considered necessary in many cases, as rapidly rising home values would quickly make up for the lack of equity at the start. Capacity also was frequently abandoned as a requirement as long as the borrower said they made sufficient income. This placed a misguided trust in credit alone, especially credit scores, to discern those who would pay from those who would not. Credit scores, like all statistical models, are predicated on the conditions remaining as they were in the past, and in this case, that past involved comprehensive underwriting. Without the collateral and capacity pieces, credit was no longer an accurate indicator of risk, and the result was a global catastrophe.Lastly, participants in the real estate business—real estate agents, brokers, underwriters, appraisers, loan officers, insurers, and so on, were generally rewarded on getting to “yes” regardless of whether the loan terms or home was appropriate for the consumer. In the most troubling cases, borrowers were encouraged to go well beyond what they could reasonably afford because the lender agent was being paid more for higher-risk loans.“In hindsight, it often appears that throughout the process, virtually everyone that a borrower would have traditionally turned to for help was not always acting in their best interest,” Cutts said. “Did some borrowers overreach to skip the starter home to go straight to the dream home? Absolutely. They were certainly guilty of dreaming, but it’s important to recognize that nearly everybody else was an enabler.”The Current ViewToday, the industry is benefiting from a continuation of historically low (although rising) mortgage interest rates coupled with a stronger overall economy and lower unemployment. Home prices have recovered in most areas to the point that they are now eclipsing the record prerecession values.A host of regulatory requirements (most notably, Truth in Lending Act regulations and Fannie Mae Day 1 Certainty™) have provided higher levels of transparency and understanding for borrowers while introducing a new level of operational complexity for lenders and servicers.Fannie Mae’s Day 1 Certainty™ has pushed lenders, at the point of sale, to look beyond the credit score and incorporate additional data points like income, asset, and employment validation to better evaluate the actual creditworthiness of borrowers. Automation has dramatically impacted how this information then feeds into—and significantly expedites—the origination process itself. Because lenders can onboard a borrower by phone, online, or mobile, they are now able to readily confirm that borrower’s information (including W-2, lines of credit, bank statements, etc.), moving qualified borrowers through the pipeline much faster.As consumers continue to embrace the mobile channel, lenders’ access to income, employment, and asset data helps empower them to obtain approval for a residential mortgage loan within minutes via their smartphone. In a rising rate environment like today’s, this will enable lenders to counter some of the volume losses through operational savings while the speed of response will aid to position them much more competitively in the marketplace.Additionally, compared to recent years, borrowers are doing their part concerning better managing their debt obligations and making their mortgage payments. This is reflected in the most recent delinquency data, which indicates that severe delinquencies (more than 90 days past due) are at the lowest level since September 2006, and that first mortgage write-offs are at the lowest level since early 2007.The big issue today is a matter of housing inventory. Ten years ago, builders couldn’t build homes fast enough to meet demand (See Figure 2). Today, they are challenged to secure the lots required to build on. They are also forced to compete for labor, as one lasting result of the recession is that many of the skilled tradesmen have either left the U.S. employment market or are now involved in commercial construction. This is hindering the industry in many markets where qualified borrowers are simply unable to find homes to purchase–especially first-time homebuyers.The Road AheadIn March 2018, there were 50 million outstanding first mortgage loans with a total cumulative balance of $8.83 trillion. The historical industry high was a total cumulative balance of $9.04 trillion in November 2008. Despite a rising rate environment and projected lower origination volumes for 2018, the industry is still on track to eclipse the mark set 10 years ago by year’s end.The future of the industry is tied to lenders’ ability to market to and serve the generation of “mobile first” consumers, or “digital natives.” Within just the last one to two years, the industry has seen tremendous progress regarding automation and efficiency and a true digital mortgage experience is finally within reach. By embracing the consumer preferences of this newest generation of homebuyers and by leveraging the capabilities of the mobile device, lenders are redefining what the origination process looks like. Borrowers expect to be able to apply instantly online or on their smartphones without the hassle of providing traditional documentation like paystubs, bank statementsand W-2 forms up front.The industry is much closer to this reality than you might think. The future will see the lending process itself turned on its ear. One that shifts away from its traditional, reactionary mode (consumer finds a house, calls real estate agent who directs him or her to a lender) to one in which lenders leverage analytics to initiate the process with qualified consumers. Or even one in which consumers apply for a mortgage loan from their smartphone while touring a home, get qualified within minutes and successfully close within weeks. As an increasing number of fintechs and nontraditional lenders continue to penetrate the market, mortgage lenders will need to have the capabilities in place to secure this information through automation and build that into their workflows to thrive.The last decade has seen the mortgage industry hit historic highs, followed by historic lows, and now rebound back toward landmark highs yet again. At the height of the previous boom, no mortgage CEO would have kept their job had they said, “we’re not going to match the market, we won’t do stated-income or pick-a-payment loans.” Today, such products are no longer available, and the emphasis is on a more efficient but robust financing model to help get consumers into homes they can afford. The lessons learned a decade ago remain at the forefront, and hopefully will never have to be relearned again. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Related Articles Craig Crabtree brings more than 20 years’ industry experience to his role, leveraging experience in origination, servicing, loss mitigation, and capital markets as he leads Equifax’s mortgage business across all solution and product categories. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago About Author: Craig Crabtree Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days agolast_img read more

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Bail Condition Shouldn’t Be Stringent Otherwise It Would Amount To Denial Of Bail And Violates Accused’s Right Of Personal Liberty

first_imgNews UpdatesBail Condition Shouldn’t Be Stringent Otherwise It Would Amount To Denial Of Bail And Violates Accused’s Right Of Personal Liberty Sparsh Upadhyay10 Jan 2021 8:36 PMShare This – xThe Chhattisgarh High Court last month observed that while granting bail, condition imposed should be not be stringent and it should be reasonable, otherwise, it would amount to denial of bail and that further amount to denial and deprivation of personal liberty of the accused violating his constitutional right guaranteed under Article 21 of the Constitution of India. The Bench of…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Chhattisgarh High Court last month observed that while granting bail, condition imposed should be not be stringent and it should be reasonable, otherwise, it would amount to denial of bail and that further amount to denial and deprivation of personal liberty of the accused violating his constitutional right guaranteed under Article 21 of the Constitution of India. The Bench of Justice Sanjay K. Agrawal further quoted Justice V.R. Krishna Iyer, who, while speaking for the Supreme Court in the matter of Babu Singh & others v. The State of U.P. (1978) 1 SCC 579 had said, “The delicate light of the law favours release unless countered by the negative criteria necessitating that course. The corrective instinct of the law plays upon release orders by strapping on to them protective and curative conditions. Heavy bail from poor men is obviously wrong. Poverty is society’s malady and sympathy, not sternness, is the judicial response.” Facts of the case The petitioner before the Court is an accused standing trial for offence under Section 420/34 of the IPC. He made an application under Section 437 of the CrPC for grant of bail and eventually that application was granted by learned Magistrate with a condition of furnishing bank guarantee of ₹ 2,00,000/­ or cash. On revision being preferred by the petitioner, First Additional Sessions Judge, Balod partly allowed the revision and reduced the amount of bank guarantee from ₹ 2,00,000 to ₹ 1,00,000 and also directed for furnishing bail bond of ₹ 10,000/­ in addition to bank guarantee. Questioning the legality and correctness of order passed by Additional Sessions Judge directing the petitioner to furnish bank guarantee of one lakh, instant petition under Section 482 of the CrPC was preferred. Court’s Observations The Court observed that it is well settled law that while exercising jurisdiction under Section 437/439 of the CrPC, it is the duty of the Court to see that condition for grant of bail should not be arbitrary or capricious, it should be just and reasonable and it cannot insist the accused to give cash security or to provide local surety. The Court further said, “An essential requirement in the imposition of any condition is that it should result in minimum interference with the personal liberty of accused and rights of police to investigate the case. A balance should be maintained between the personal liberty of the accused and investigational right of police.” The Court also relied on Apex Court’s ruling in the case of Moti Ram and others v. State of Madhya Pradesh (1978) 4 SCC 47 wherein the Court had deprecated the practice of demanding heavy sums by way of bail. Coming to the facts of the case, the Court noted. “It is quite vivid that in the instant case, though the accused had been admitted to the privilege of bail under Section 437 of the CrPC and he is only a small agriculturist, yet stringent and onerous condition of furnishing bank guarantee of ₹ 2,00,000/­ was imposed by the trial Magistrate though that has partly been modified by the revisional Court from ₹ 2,00,000/­ to ₹ 1,00,000/­, but still condition of furnishing bank guarantee of ₹ 1,00,000/­ is stringent and excessively onerous condition, which cannot be said to be reasonable condition for grant of bail in the light of aforesaid mandate of the Supreme Court (rulings).” Accordingly, the condition imposing bank guarantee of ₹ 1,00,000/¬ was thereby set-aside and the accused was directed to be released forthwith on bail on furnishing bail bond of ₹ 20,000/¬ to the satisfaction of the trial Court. Related news In the matter of M. D. Dhanapal v. State rep. By the Inspector of Police, the Apex Court in the year 2019 had held that bail cannot be made conditional upon heavy deposit beyond the financial capacity of the applicant. In December 2019, while recapitulating the principles to be followed by courts while granting bail, the Himachal Pradesh High Court had highlighted that poverty or the deemed indigent status of an accused must be taken into account while granting bail. Further, in September 2020, while reducing the amount of sureties for Bail of a “poor person”, the Uttarakhand High Court had observed that the petitioner could not get his freedom back because he could not arrange for sureties. The Single Bench of Justice Ravindra Maithani had remarked, “In the instant case petitioner is in jail because he is poor. It cannot be afforded; it should not happen and this Court will not allow it to happen.” Also, in June 2020, the Punjab and Haryana High Court had held that the bail conditions imposed by a court should not be so onerous that they prove “fatal to bail”. “The condition of bail or the burden imposed on it, ought not to be such so as to defeat the very meaning of bail. Else, might as well decline the bail instead of giving an illusory one,” the bench Justice Arun Monga said. It is interesting to note what the Apex Court had stated (quoting observation of American President Lyndon B. Johnson) in the Case of Moti Ram (supra) in para no. 15. We are reproducing the said para of the Judgment as hereunder:- “15. It is interesting that American criminological thinking and research had legislative response and the Bail Reforms Act, 1966 came into being. The then President, Lyndon B. Johnson made certain observations at the signing ceremony: Today, we join to recognize a major development in our system of criminal justice : the reform of the bail system. This system has endued-archaic, unjust and virtually unexamined -since the Judiciary Act of 1789. The principal purpose of bail is to insure that an accused person will return for trial if he is released after arrest. How is that purpose met under the present system? The defendant with means can afford to pay bail. He can afford to buy his freedom. But the poorer defendant cannot pay the price. He languishes in jail weeks, months and perhaps even years before trial. He does not stay in jail because he is guilty. He does not stay in jail because any sentence has been passed. He does not stay in jail because he is any more likely to flee before trial. He stays in jail for one reason only-because he is poor…”Case title – Bhagwat Joshi v. State of Chhattisgarh [Cr.M.P.No.1395 of 2020] Click Here To Download OrderRead OrderNext Storylast_img read more

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What Is Coming Up With 2016 ISTEP – View From The Classroom

first_imgWhat is coming up with 2016 ISTEP – View From The ClassroomWHO: Southwestern Indiana Voices for Public Schools, various guests (FaceBook event) and any persons with stories about ISTEP. We expect more than 15 persons.WHAT: Town Hall type of discussion of ISTEP 2016 and other education issues.WHERE: North Park Public Library, 960 Koehler Drive, Evansville, IN(adjacent to Central High School Property)WHEN: Tuesday, February 16, 2016WHY: Anticipating ISTEP 2016; recognizing concerns of families, taxpayers and educators with the ongoing education issues in K-12 schools; and in hopes of motivating change among state legislators by steady activism, Voices for Public Schools is holding a Q&A session.HOW: Our attitude is to assist the public in respectfully pointing out the issues in K-12 education and to begin in our community to find ways to encourage the General Assembly to abandon badly performing programs, tests and curricula that represent over-reach into local school districts.After a short presentation, there will be questions and discussion. All data used is from the Indiana Department of Education website. Children are welcome.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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OC Home Bank Recognizes Volunteer of Year

first_imgLeft to right: Beth Morgenweck, Assistant Vice President of Marketing; Sue Jones, Accounting; Janette Raab, Vice President of AccountingNews release from Ocean City Home Bank:Ocean City Home Bank is committed to making a difference in the community, and Susan Jones, an employee in the Bank’s Accounting Department, certainly exhibits that commitment. The Upper Township resident worked tirelessly last year to support worthwhile causes such as March of Dimes, Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, and Walk for the Wounded, earning her the title of “Volunteer of the Year” for 2014.A Team Captain for the March of Dimes’ March for Babies for the past 20 years, Jones spends months coordinating the annual walk, encouraging others to participate, and raising funds. Throughout the past three years, she has also contributed significant time to Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, organizing a walking team in honor of a coworker and friend. Jones also volunteers for the annual Walk for The Wounded and serves as a member of the advisory council for the Retired Senior Volunteer Program of Cape May County. As Ocean City Home Bank’s Volunteer of the Year, Susan received a $150 donation to the nonprofit organization of her choice, as well as a cash prize of $150.“To understand just how dedicated Susan is to these charities, simply consider Susan’s response when she was asked which organization she would like to benefit from the $150 donation,” said Steve Brady, President and Chief Executive Officer of Ocean City Home Bank. “She could not decide between March of Dimes and Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. Rather than flipping a coin or asking to split the donation in half, Susan asked that the $150 donation go to the March of Dimes, and her personal prize of $150 go to Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, in her co-worker’s name. That is true generosity and commitment to the community, and we’re fortunate to have her on our team.”Ocean City Home Bank encourages Jones and other employees to donate their time through the “It Pays To Give” volunteer incentive program, which recognizes and rewards employees for volunteering in their community. Additionally, the Bank coordinates numerous group volunteer events throughout as a way to help those in need while fostering a team spirit.last_img read more

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This Mall Cop Lip-Syncing To Paul McCartney’s “Come On To Me” Is Utterly Amazing

first_img[Video: PAUL McCARTNEY][H/T Billboard] In early September, Sir Paul McCartney released his seventeenth studio album, Egypt Station, the first new album from The Beatles‘ singer/songwriter/guitarist in five years, via Capitol Records. Ahead of its release, during the initial album announcement in June, McCartney dropped the album’s two lead singles including the hilariously flirtatious “Come On To Me”, which peaked at No. 10 on Billboard‘s Adult Contemporary chart, securing the title of Sir Paul’s first top 10 hit since 1993.On Tuesday, Paul McCartney officially released a new music video for “Come On To Me” featuring an unassuming mall cop enthusiastically lip-syncing to the contagiously saucy, feel-good tune. Initially, the mall cop named Freddie listens to the characteristically bland muzak that plagues malls across America, rolling his eyes as he scans over security footage. However, once the rhythmic guitar riff of “Come On To Me” drops in, Freddie’s demeanor changes, and his charismatic performance begins. The video is truly smile-inducing, with the mall cop popping up in vacant stores, dancing, singing, and clearly having a grand time throughout his romp across the deserted mall.The delightful video was posted by the official Paul McCartney camp with a challenge inviting fans to create their own lip-syncing videos for “Come On To Me”. Notes the description, “Do you think you have better moves than Freddie? Show us! Film yourself dancing to ‘Come On To Me’ and post a video to Instagram or Twitter using the hashtag #COTMChallenge.” While we’re certainly excited to see videos from this challenge, let’s just say we’re #TeamFred all the way.Check out the video of Freddie dancing and lip-syncing to Paul McCartney’s “Come On To Me” below.Paul McCartney – “Come On To Me” [Official Video]last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s women gather for pajama-themed karaoke night

first_imgMamma Mia and *NSYNC tracks blasted from the basement of Saint Mary’s Student Center on Thursday at Karaoke Night hosted by the College’s Resident Hall Association (RHA) events committee.The night was pajama themed, and girls gathered with their friends in slippers and matching pajama sets waiting for their turn to sing. In addition to karaoke, women could enter their names in a raffle for the chance to win a variety of prizes, junior and vice committee president Nicole McCaffery said.The RHA events committee receives funds for all its different events, and the group decided to allocate a large sum of the money for Karaoke Night.“We get a fund every year, and this semester we got a really big one, so we were able to get bigger gifts,” McCaffery said. The RHA events committee has hosted events like this in the past and Bella Escobedo, junior and RHA events president, said the group hopes these events bring the College’s community together.“We love getting the community together, and we love having the girls bond and have a lot of fun,” she said. “Last year we did a similar Halloween karaoke event. This karaoke night is actually an annual event that the events committee puts on. In the fall we hosted Trunk or Treat, and we had the faculty bring their kids in for that.”The events committee teamed up with RHA for the event with volunteers running the night.“The RHA events committee and the other RHA executive board also comes and helps out,” McCaffery said. “They come and volunteer for the different shifts throughout the event, so they’ll help with the set-up and tear down and things in between.”McCaffery said Karaoke Night required a significant amount of planning, but she enjoyed the preparations. “I think it’s fun to decorate and get people together,” she said. “Everyone has a certain job that they like to do for these events. Some people like to do the decorations, some people like to just brainstorm and come up with the ideas for what to do for the event, so it’s just fun to get everyone together and to create this event and to get a bunch of girls from the Saint Mary’s community to come together and hang out.”McCaffery said the committee welcomed women who have attended their events in the past and women who haven’t had the chance to come to their events before.“I came because I heard there was going to be karaoke and mozzarella sticks, but yeah we all came with friends and wanted to be a part of the social aspect of it all,” first year Lexi Trombly said. “We usually just hang out in our room, so we wanted to come out to an event.”McCaffery said the RHA events committee will continue to foster community through campus-wide events.“It’s like a sisterhood. You really have that and can meet new people — even though it’s a small campus, you meet new people every year,” McCaffery said. “We grow as an organization with the events, so we’re able to change them and improve every year, so I think it’s homier compared to other colleges. We’re like a family, and I really like that.”Tags: Community, Residence Hall Association, Singinglast_img read more

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Odds & Ends: PBS Sets Air Date for Hamilton Doc & More

first_img Hamilton Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. PBS Sets Air Date for Hamilton DocumentaryWe know you’ve been waiting for it…PBS will air the previously reported Hamilton feature film documentary on October 21. Part of the Great Performances series, Hamilton’s America will provide intimate access to the show’s creator and star, Lin-Manuel Miranda, and his colleagues during the two years leading up to the Broadway opening. Expect interviews with experts and prominent personalities, new footage of the production in New York and so much more. As you all know by now, Hamilton is playing at the Richard Rodgers Theatre.Al Pacino to Receive Kennedy Center HonorTwo-time Tony and Oscar winner Al Pacino will be one of five honorees to receive the 2016 Kennedy Center Honors. The other recipients are Argentine pianist Martha Argerich, rock band the Eagles, gospel and blues singer Mavis Staples and musician James Taylor; the celebration will be broadcast on CBS on December 27.Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Date ShiftThere’s been a slight switcheroo to when critics will formally be able to air their opinions about Harry Potter and the Cursed Child in London’s West End. They can now start publishing five days earlier, just after midnight on July 26. The opening gala is still scheduled for July 30, with the official script being published on July 31. Previews began on June 7 at the Palace Theatre.Laura Michelle Kelly & More Tapped for RagtimeA host of Broadway favorites will star in a one-night-only developmental concert of Ragtime on Ellis Island on August 8. Laura Michelle Kelly (Finding Neverland) will play Mother, with Brandon Victor Dixon (Shuffle Along) as Coalhouse Walker Jr. and Michael Park (Dear Evan Hansen) as Father, as well as Shaina Taub as Emma Goldman, Robert Petkoff as Tateh, Cooper Grodin as Harry K. Thaw, Aisha Jackson as Sarah’s Friend, Jeremy Morse as Harry Houdini, Rod Singleton as Booker T. Washington, Annie Sherman as Evelyn Nesbit and Georgia Engel as Houdini’s Mother. And, #TBT…Check out Brian Stokes Mitchell, Audra McDonald and Marin Mazzie leading the original 1998 Broadway cast’s performance at the Tony Awards below. from $149.00 Related Showscenter_img Phillipa Soo & Lin-Manuel Miranda in ‘Hamilton'(Photo: Joan Marcus) View Commentslast_img read more

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November 1, 2002 On the Move

first_imgOn the Move Christopher M. Bohne has become associated with Phelps Dunbar, LLP, with offices at 100 S. Ashley Dr., Ste. 1900, Tampa 33602, telephone (813)472-7550. He concentrates in the area of business law. Jonathan R. Friedland announces the formation of the Law Offices of Jonathan R. Friedland, P.A., with offices at 9130 S. Dadeland Blvd., Ste. 1609, Miami 33156, telephone (305)370-0660. The firm concentrates in the areas of plaintiffs’ personal injury and wrongful death. Edward Hamann has become associated with Clayton & McCulloh, with offices at 1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd., Maitland 32751, (407)875-2655. He concentrates in the areas of collections and bankruptcy. Miguel A. Maspons has become a shareholder with Carlton Fields, with offices at 400 International Place, 100 SE Second St., Miami 33131, telephone (305)854-5900. He practices in the firm’s corporate, securities, and taxation practice group. Clayton J. Mynard announces the formation of the Law Offices of Clayton J. Mynard, P.L., with offices at 4302 Henderson Blvd., Ste. 100, Tampa 33629, telephone (813)251-0848. He concentrates in the areas of business and technology transactions. Clyde W. “Billy” Galloway has become a shareholder with Volpe, Bajalia, Wickes & Rogerson, with offices at 1301 Riverplace Blvd., Ste. 1700, Jacksonville 32207, telephone (904)355-1700. He practices in the firm’s corporate and administrative law groups. Anthony Dieguez announces the relocation of offices to 7950 N.W. 155th St., Ste. 207, Miami Lakes 33016, telephone (305)556-4106. Bryan W. Sykes has become a shareholder with GrayHarris, with offices at 201 N. Franklin Ave., Ste. 2200, Tampa 33601, telephone (813)273-5132. He concentrates in the areas of commercial real estate and land use law. David Shontz and Wendell Bruce Hays have become associated with Broad & Cassel, with offices at 390 N. Orange Ave., Ste. 1100, Orlando 32801, telephone (407)481-5207. They practice in the firm’s eminent domain practice group. Patrick M. Muldowney has become of counsel to Akerman Senterfitt, with offices at 255 S. Orange Ave., 17th Fl., Orlando 32801, telephone (407)843-7861. He practices in the firm’s labor and employment practice group. Joseph G. Santoro has become associated with Gunster Yoakley, with offices at 777 S. Flagler Dr., Ste. 500 E., West Palm Beach 33401, telephone (561)650-0640. He practices in the firm’s litigation department. Brian Powers and Andrew DeGraffenreidt III have joined Alternative Resolution Consultants, with offices at 777 S. Flagler Dr., Ste. 800 W., West Palm Beach 33401, telephone (561)515-6044. William Scott Patterson, formerly of St. Paul Cos. National Coverage Group, announces the opening of William Scott Patterson, P.C., with offices at 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W., Ste. 700 N., Washington, DC 20004, telephone (202)204-2555, and at 710 S. Dixie Hwy., Miami 33146. Paul R. Buckin, Mayra Calzadilla, Mark B. Kravitz, Carlos Gimenez, and Veronica Vilarchao have become associated with Steel, Hector & Davis, LLP, with offices at 200 S. Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 4000, Miami 33131-2398, telephone (305)577-7000. Buckin, Calzadilla, and Kravitz practice in the firm’s litigation department, Gimenez in the government and regulatory department, and Vilarchao in the tax department. Ashley McCorvey Myers announces the opening of Ashley M. Myers, P.A., with offices at 4230 S. MacDill, Ste. 230, Tampa 33611, telephone (813)839-7440. She concentrates in the areas of family law and bankruptcy. John D. Bonanno and Lori Maryl Dorman have become associated with Hamrick, Perrey, Quinlan & Smith, P.A., with offices at 601 12th St. W., Bradenton 34205, telephone (941)747-1871. Bonanno concentrates in the areas of corporate and tax law, and Dorman in real estate and business law. Carrie L. Freeman has joined Fowler White Boggs Banker, with offices at 501 E. Kennedy Blvd., Ste. 1700, Tampa 33602, telephone (813)228-7411, as the firm’s new director of professional recruiting and development. Sean Santini has become a shareholder with Greenberg Traurig, LLP, with offices at 1221 Brickell Ave., Miami 33131, telephone (305)579-0500. He concentrates in the area of international litigation. Mitchell C. Robiner has joined Gardner, Wilkes, Shaheen & Candelora, with offices at 401 E. Jackson St., Ste. 2650, Tampa 33602, telephone (813)221-8000. He concentrates in the area of commercial litigation. Andrew B. Goshen and Shelley Boney Forte, formerly of the Office of the Judges of Compensation Claims, Jacksonville District, announce the formation of Goshen & Forte Mediations, with offices at 4191 San Juan Ave., Jacksonville 32210, telephone (904)387-3377. Teresa L. Rajala has joined Kirk Pinkerton, with offices at 720 S. Orange Ave., Sarasota 34236, telephone (941)364-2400. She concentrates in the areas of tax and estate planning. Ghenette Wright Muir has joined Legal Aid Service of Broward County, Inc., with offices at 609 S.W. First Ave., Ft. Lauderdale 33301, telephone (954)765-8950. She concentrates in the areas of landlord/tenant and other housing matters. Harbsmeier, DeZayas & Appel, LLP, announces the relocation of its Ft. Lauderdale office to 2455 E. Sunrise Blvd., Ste. 511, Ft. Lauderdale 33304, telephone (954)564-8165. Timothy Maze Hartley has been named to manage the office. He concentrates in the areas of insurance and employment-related matters. Mark A. Coel has become a partner with Michaud, Buschmann, Mittelmark, Millian, Blitz & Warren, P.A., with offices at 33 S.E. 8th St., Boca Raton 33432, telephone (561)392-0540. He concentrates in the areas of healthcare law and business organization. Margaret E. Bowles has become a shareholder with GrayHarris, with offices at 201 N. Franklin Ave., Ste. 2200, Tampa 33601, telephone (813)273-5132. She concentrates in the areas of commercial real estate and land use. Peter L. Meltzer and Reinaldo Castellanos have joined Hyman, Kaplan, Ganguzza, Spector & Mars, P.A., with offices at 150 W. Flagler St., Ste. 2701, Miami 33130, telephone (305)371-4244. Steve Gavin has become vice president and general counsel to Tractebel Power, Inc., with offices at 1177 W. Loop S., Ste. 300, Houston, Texas 77027, telephone (713)552-2277. J. Thomas Cardwell has been named chair and CEO of Akerman Senterfitt, with offices at 255 S. Orange Ave., 17th Fl., Orlando 32801, telephone (407)843-7861. Sheila McGuigan has become associated with Rieth & Ritchie, P.A., with offices at 101 E. Kennedy Blvd., Ste. 2430, Tampa 33602, telephone (813)472-7330. She concentrates in the areas of trusts and estates. Alan Aronson, former general counsel for the Palm Beach County Police Benevolent Association, has become associated with Rosenthal & Weissman, P.A., 1645 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 350, West Palm Beach 33401, telephone (561)478-2500. He concentrates in representing workers’ compensation claimants. George B. Cappy, P.A., announces the relocation of his offices to 900 W. Platt St., Suite 200, Tampa 33606, telephone (813)251-5145. He concentrates in the areas of workers’ compensation, personal injury and wrongful death, and longshore disability. Alba Varela has joined Holtzman, Equels & Furia, with offices at 2601 S. Bayshore Dr., Ste. 600, Miami 33133, telephone (305)859-7700. She will be a senior associate in the Litigation Practice Group. Rafael E. Alfonzo has become associated with Holland & Knight, LLP, with offices at 701 Brickell Ave., Ste. 3000, Miami 33131, telephone (305)349-2253. He practices in the firm’s litigation department, concentrating in civil litigation, international litigation, and white collar criminal defense. Alexander R. Rodriguez recently joined the law firm of A. Francisco Areces, P.A., as an associate with offices at 150 Alhambra Circle, Ste. 1270, Coral Gables, FL 33134, telephone (305) 444-5000. Rodriguez concentrates in the areas of personal injury and medical malpractice. Osvaldo Torres has joined the Miami office of Akerman Senterfitt, with offices at 1 S.E. 3rd Ave., 28th Fl., Miami 33131, telephone (305)374-5600, as of counsel in the firm’s corporate department. Torres will focus his practice in the areas of general corporate, securities, and help the firm build its emerging media and entertainment practice. Kevin M. O’Brien has become associated with Phelps Dunbar, LLP, with offices at 100 S. Ashley Dr., Ste. 1900, Tampa 33602, telephone (813)472-7550. He will concentrate in the firm’s insurance practice section. Michael W. McNatt has become associated with Akerman Senterfitt, with offices at 255 S. Orange Ave., 17th Fl., Orlando 32801, telephone (407)843-7861 in the banking practice group. Nicole Rekant, Giannini Cheda, and Cristina Alonso have joined Carlton Fields, with offices at 400 International Place, 100 SE Second St., Miami 33131, telephone (305)854-5900. Rekant and Alonso will practice in the firm’s appellate practice and trial support practice group. Cheda concentrates in the areas of corporate, securities, and taxation law. S. David Cooper and Cheyenne Young have become associated with Clayton & McCulloh in Maitland, 1065 Maitland Center Commons Blvd., Maitland 32751, telephone (407)875-2655. Beverly J. White, formerly senior counsel with USAA in Tampa, has joined Raymond L. Parri. The new firm Parri & White, P.A., continues with their offices in Clearwater and Port Richey but have also opened a branch office at 115 N. MacDill Avenue, Tampa 33609, telephone (813)873-8875. The firm concentrates in the areas of Medicaid, SSI, individual and pooled special needs trusts, estate planning, estate and trust administration and guardianship. Roxanne Beilly has become of counsel and Robert McCausland has become associated with Katz, Barron, Squitero & Faust, P.A. , 100 N.E. Third Ave., Ssuite 280, Ft. Lauderdale 33301, telephone (954)522-3636. Beilly will concentrate in securities law, corporate law, investment banking, mergers and acquisitions, venture capital and business law, and McCausland will practice in the litigation department. Leonard Keen and Mark R. Malek have become associated with Allen, Dyer, Doppelt, Milbrath & Gilchrist, P.A., 255 South Orange Avenue, Suite 1401, Orlando 32801, telephone (407)841-2330. Walter L. Sanders has become associated with Dennis LeVine & Associates, P.A., 103 S. Boulevard, Tampa 33606, telephone (813)253-0777. He concentrates in creditors’ rights and bankruptcy. David M. Halpen has become a shareholder of Dunwody White & Landon, P.A., in the firm’s Palm Beach office, 239 S. County Road, Suite 300, Palm Beach 33480, telephone (561)655-2120. Halpen concentrates in trust and estate planning, partnership, planning, corporate planning, and trust and estate administration. Hayden Dempsey, former of the Florida Governor’s Office, has joined GrayHarris at 301 S. Bronough St., Suite 600, Tallahassee 32301, telephone (850)222-7717. He concentrates in governmental affairs, litigation, and administrative matters. Laurence Appel has joined Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc., in Jacksonville as senior vice president and general counsel. Dana M. Gallup, P.A. announces the relocation of offices to 4000 Hollywood Boulevard, Presidential Circle, Suite 265 South, Hollywood 33021, telephone (954)894-3035. He concentrates in labor and employment law. Adam Weisholtz, formerly law clerk to Fourth District Court of Appeal Judge Robert M. Gross, has become assistant district counsel with the U.S. Departent of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service, at 155 S. Miami Avenue, Miami 33031, telephone (305)400-6160. Sanjay Kurian, formerly law clerk to Fourth District Court of Appeal Judge Robert M. Gross, as become associated with the Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., with offices at 13515 Bell Tower Drive, Suite 101, Ft. Myers 33907, telephone (239)433-7707. Mia L. McKown, former general counsel for the Florida Department of Citrus, has become of counsel with Akerman Senterfitt, with offices at 301 S. Bronough St., Ste. 300, Tallahassee 32301, telephone (850)222-3471. She concentrates on litigation, administrative law, and government relations. Douglas C. Hiller has joined the law firm of Landy & Associates, 801 NE 167th St., 2nd Floor, North Miami Beach 33162, telephone (305)455-2040. Hiller concentrates in complex commercial litigation, securities arbitration, and corporate transactions. Myra Gendel has become a partner at Ackerman Link & Sartory, P.A., 222 Lakeview Avenue, Suite 1250 Esperante, West Palm Beach 33401, telephone (561)838-4100. Gendel concentrates in commercial loans, real estate and asset based financing and sales, and title insurance. Dianne Weaver has joined Harrell and Johnson, P.A., 4735 Sunbeam Road, Jacksonville 32257, telephone (904)296-9400. She concentrates in the areas of wrongful death, medical malpractice, and complex personal injury litigation. Ashish Airan, Ronald J. Bogani, James Scott Herman, Eric C. Reed, Bryan S. Resnick, Matthew Brock Shields, Tania M. Williams, Donna S. Zmijewski, and Michael E. Zmijewski have joined the Ninth Circuit State Attorney’s Office, 415 N. Orange Ave., Orlando 32802, telephone (407)836-2400. The office serves Orange and Osceola counties. Jon M. Gibbs has become associated with Allen, Dyer, Doppelt, Milbrath & Gilchrist, P.A., 255 South Orange Ave., Suite 1401, Orlando 32801, phone (407) 841-2330. He concentrates in patent law. George Richards, former deputy Chief of the Juvenile Division of the 13th Circuit State Attorney’s Office, has become an assistant statewide prosecutor with the Office of Statewide Prosecution, Sullivan Centre, 2075 W. First St., Suite 202, Ft. Myers 33901, telephone (941) 338-2440. Pierre A.L. Mommers and Joseph G. Colombo announce the formation of Mommers & Colombo, with offices at 2351 W. Eau Gallie Blve., Suite 1, Melbourne 32935, telephone (321)751-1000. The firm concentrates in commercial litigation, estate planning, and business law. Carlos A. Zumpano has become associated with the Miami office of Duane Morris, 200 S. Biscayne Blvd., Suite 3410, Miami 33131, telephone (305)960-2200. Ty G. Thompson, has become associated with Mills Paskert Divers, P.A., 100 N. Tampa St., Suite 2010, Tampa 33602, telephone (813)229-3501. He concentrates in business and commercial litigation and construction and surety litigation. Robert H. Waltuch, has joined as a shareholder Fowler White Boggs Banker, with offices at 501 E. Kennedy Blvd., Ste. 1700, Tampa 33602, telephone (813)228-7411. He practices in the areas of estate planning, administration of trusts and estates, and post mortem tax planning. Kevin Johnson has become a shareholder with Thompson, Sizemore & Gonzalez, P.A., 501 E. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 1400, Tampa 33601, telephone (813)273-0050. He concentrates on representing employers. November 1, 2002 On the Move November 1, 2002 On the Movelast_img read more

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Key House, Senate reps on NAFCU Congressional Caucus slate

first_imgCredit unions will hear from lawmakers and policy makers who are shaping discussions at the federal level on credit union regulatory relief, NCUA budget transparency and more during NAFCU’s Congressional Caucus this September in Washington.The Congressional Caucus, NAFCU’s credit union lobbying event of the year, is moving to the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill. Scheduled Sept. 14-17, the event will bring hundreds of credit union leaders to Washington to talk about key issues, meet with lawmakers and hear the latest on legislation and regulation affecting them.Confirmed speakers include:Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, the ranking member of the Senate Banking Committee;Freddie Mac CEO Donald Layton;Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., both the U.S. House Chief Deputy Majority Whip and vice chairman of the House Financial Services Committee;Rep. Bill Huizenga, R-Mich., chairman of the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Monetary Policy and Trade;Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer, R-Mo., chairman of the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Housing and Insurance;Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., member of the House Financial Services Committee;Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., member of the House Financial Services Committee.The above lawmakers are chief sponsors of several bills pushed by NAFCU and its member credit unions. Brown sponsored legislation last Congress (and mirrored in new bills this year) to provide statutory relief from yearly privacy notice requirements. Huizenga is chief sponsor of H.R. 685, the “Mortgage Choice Act,” which would adjust the Truth in Lending Act to exempt affiliated title charges and certain escrow charges from the qualified mortgage cap on points and fees. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Body Found on Beach in Setauket Harbor ID’d as Plane Crash Victim

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A man found dead on the beach in Setauket Harbor on Monday morning was identified as someone who has been missing since a small, single-engine plane crash two months ago, Suffolk County police said.Gerson Salmon-Negron, 23, of Queens, was found shortly after 9 a.m., police said. Three others were rescued from the crash.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img

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